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9 results for Kibler, Dan
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Record #:
6971
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North Carolina waters contain a multitude of fish collectively known as bream. Physical differences are slight, such as shades of color and number of hard rays on the dorsal fin. Habitats, favorite foods, and times of spawning are things that further distinguish them. Kibler describes a number of bream, including the bluegill, shellcracker, redbreast, pumpkinseed, and flier.
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Record #:
8530
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The Blue Ridge Parkway extends 469 miles through Virginia and North Carolina. The North Carolina section runs from milepost 216 to milepost 469. In streams just off the parkway is some of the best trout fishing in the state. Anglers can fish from one end of the parkway to the other with either a north Carolina or Virginia fishing license. An NC Comprehensive Fishing License is recommended because of the difficulty in determining the dividing line between federal and state lands. Kibler describes fishing sites in the northern, central, and southern sections of the parkway in North Carolina.
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Record #:
5799
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When most people think of trout fishing, they think of mountain streams comes to mind. In North Carolina that means the Great Smoky Mountains. However, two state parks, Stone Mountain and South Mountain, have a variety of streams that will please trout anglers. Kibler describes these fishing areas that are located within an easy drive of the state's major population centers.
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Record #:
6778
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Fishermen sometimes move fish from one body of water to another in hopes of creating a new fishery, and in so doing, often create a new problem. \"People can bring fish in by the thousands, and nine of ten times, it doesn't help or hurt anything, but that tenth time, it ruins everything,\" says David Yow, a fisheries biologist for the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. The best advice biologists give to fishermen is to leave fish stocking to the pros. Kibler discusses what can happen when a species is introduced into waters where it doesn't belong.
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Record #:
7066
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Fishing for bass during the winter months is a slow, painstaking process, and the following factors should be considered when fishing in the cold. Cooling surface waters send fish to the lower depths. Since the bass is a cold-blooded creature, falling temperatures slow down its reaction time, and it doesn't chase after a lure. Bigger lures, instead of smaller ones, work better because the fish wants the biggest meal with the least amount of effort. Hot areas in the lakes attract fish. These are produced by power plants releasing used, warmer water back into the lake. Temperatures in these hot spots can be twenty degrees higher than the rest of the lake waters.
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Record #:
7496
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A number of hunters use food plots to attract deer in season instead of putting bait, such as corn, apples, and sweet potatoes, on the ground. Food plots also provide nourishment year-round. Among the forage plants that provide nutrition for game animals are clover, oats, chicory, soybeans, cowpeas, chufa, turnips, and vetch.
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Record #:
7490
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Kibler discusses catfishing, which is growing in popularity in North Carolina and across the country. The catfish is the biggest freshwater game fish in North American waters. In North Carolina the largest are the blue catfish, with a state record of eighty-five pounds, and the flathead catfish, with a state record of seventy-eight pounds. Tournaments devoted to catfishing offer thousands of dollars in prizes. Tackle companies have introduced equipment specifically for catfishing, and a number of how-to books on catching these big fish have been published.
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Record #:
7654
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Brown bullhead, white catfish, white perch, yellow perch, chain pickerel, and common carp are among species often scorned, ignored, and under-fished by freshwater fishermen. Fishermen who do seek them out can find an exciting day of fishing and a tasty meal. Kibler describes the fish, where to find them, and whether they are good to eat.
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Record #:
8667
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Kibler discusses the work of four North Carolina artisans who combine function and art to create turkey calls. They are Jeff Valentine (Wake Forest); Tony Quarino (Waxhaw); Ed Wynn (Hertford); and Don Carter (Merry Hill). Their calls are either adorned with paintings or constructed of unusual woods that provide a unique look.
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