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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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80 results for Dean, Jim
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Record #:
6050
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Shortia is one of North Carolina's and the world's rarest plants. Few people have ever heard of it; fewer still have seen it. In the state the flower is found only in a few places in Burke, Macon, McDowell, and Transylvania Counties. Dean discusses the plant's history from its discovery by French botanist Andre Michaux on September 8, 1788, its rediscovery in 1877, and its current status.
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Record #:
9363
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When Michael Smith was nineteen, he had an accident water-skiing that left him handicapped and confined to a wheelchair. A gift from a neighbor of a set of charcoal pencils would play a part in his later becoming a painter of waterfowl. Although he returned to North Carolina State University to study sociology, drawing and painting started to occupy more of his time. Dean discusses Smith's work and career as an artist.
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Record #:
9715
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Dean discusses the work of wildlife artist Larry Barton. The Winston-Salem resident left a long career as a cartoonist four years ago to begin painting again. He is recognized as one of the leading outdoor artists in the nation.
Record #:
15306
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The North Carolina Wildlife Commission began its Delayed Harvest Program twenty years ago. The program currently covers twenty-one streams and one lake. Regulations require that all fishermen release the trout they catch between October first and the first Saturday in June. They must fish with a single hook artificial lure or fly. Beginning in June, fishermen are allowed to keep seven trout a day. Dean discusses other requirements of the program which is one of the Wildlife Commission's most popular.
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Record #:
19273
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Dean discusses what steps to take when improving the fishing in a new or renovated pond, and the people to turn to when you need advice.
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Record #:
24847
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Jim Dean recounts the story of the first house he bought while on his second job out of college. It was infested with mice as he found out after buying the house. Not wanting to make holes in the walls, he procured his Daisy Red Ryder carbine and began a mouse hunt through his house.
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Record #:
25938
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Lake Mattamuskeet has been known as one of the best places for Canadian geese hunting in the world, but the lake has gone to bust over the past decade. Dean details the findings presented in a July issue of Wildlife in North Carolina written by NCWRC waterfowl biologist Jack Donnelley, US Bureau of Sport Fishreis and Wildlife biologist Otto Florschutz, and Mattamuskeet Refuge Manager John Davis. Research found that dwindling geese populations could be attributed to changes in corn and soybean production in North Carolina, as well as excessive hunting pressure in the area.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Summer 1973, p15-16
Record #:
25948
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Preliminary findings have discovered that organic water pollution is creating the conditions for disease among game fish in North Carolina’s fishing lakes. The disease, which has been found to be present in all southeastern states, produces sores lesions on the fish skin, scales, and mouths. Pollution from sewage, industrial waste, and runoff produce the conditions which favor the condition to be spread among populations; however, at the time there is no particular solution except to limit pollution into the river and lake systems.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p6
Record #:
25950
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There is a widespread notion that wildlife in North Carolina is rapidly disappearing. But 23 years of protection, management, and research have kept many species abundant in the state thanks to the efforts of state and federal programs and hunters and fishers themselves.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p14
Record #:
25954
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In response to questions about what the NC Wildlife Resources Commission actually does, Dean provides an editorial showing some of the projects being carried out by the Commission. These include studying different strains of bass in order to improve bass fishing in the state; the establishment of silt controls for road builders which prevents loss of streams and rivers; the provision of seeds that can be planted for game populations; and hunting and boating safety programs.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 18 Issue 3, Summer 1974, p2, 6
Record #:
25976
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The Neuse River offers one of the finest areas for game habitat such as squirrels. However, some stretches of the river and its tributaries are in danger of being flooded by the Fall of Neuse Reservoir completion.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Mar-Apr 1975, p22
Record #:
25981
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Big questions in wildlife conservation are: who should pay for habitat and how should wildlife money be spent? In the 1930s and 1950s legislation put most the financial burden on hunters and fishermen through taxes on gear and licenses. But now, the Council on Environmental Quality and the US Fish and Wildlife Service are studying a proposed tax on non-hunting and non-fishing users of public wildlife lands in order to protect both game and non-game species and lands.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p7
Record #:
25982
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Almost every spring the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission holds public hearings, and many times there are concerns that Wildlife Protectors no longer live on game lands. Dean explains the reasoning behind the move of Wildlife Protectors out of the areas and into mobile teams of enforcement, which included a need for more saturation in problem areas and preventing violators from taking advantage of a protector’s routine.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p8
Record #:
25987
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The Robeson County Wildlife Club carries the conservation message from one end of the county to the other. In various cities throughout the county, the Club provides programs such as beautification projects, educational programs, and participation in law and legislation change.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p21
Record #:
25979
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The North Carolina State Legislature recently passed a bill that will increase hunting and combination license fees.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p4, 28
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