NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Oyster fisheries
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1869
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's oyster production has declined at an alarming rate since the turn of the century. N.C. Sea Grant, the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, and other interested parties convened a summit to address the state's feeble oyster industry.
Source:
Record #:
4423
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the start of the 20th-century, over a million bushels of oysters were harvested annually in the state. Pollution, over-harvesting, and silty runoffs from coastal construction reduced harvests to 55,000 bushels yearly in the 1990s. Jim and Bonnie Swartzenburg are among a number of oysters farmers seeking to restore the state's oyster culture.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 32 Issue 1, Jan 2000, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4451
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's oyster industry has declined since the start of the 20th-century, dropping from an annual harvest of two million bushels to 44,613 bushels in 1998. Over-harvesting, harvesting methods, and a natural occurring parasite are contributors to the decline. Recommendations to alleviate the oyster crisis include aquaculture, improving the quality of coastal waters, and developing disease resistant strains.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p6-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
11749
Abstract:
Montgomery discusses North Carolina's oyster industry, which has a yearly value of $100,000.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 11, Aug 1934, p18, 22, il
Full Text:
Record #:
14969
Abstract:
The oyster industry has been elevated to a position of great importance in the commercial fishery business of North Carolina. Due to the rapidly increasing consumption of oysters, which has badly depleted the supply of natural beds in North Carolina, the State Department of Conservation has been making an effort to rehabilitate existing beds and encourage new beds in the sound along the coast by the transplantation of seed oysters.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 31, Jan 1943, p3, 20, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
3916
Author(s):
Abstract:
A hundred years ago the state's oystermen annually harvested over 2.5 million bushels. However, overharvesting by dredging, lack of fishing law enforcement, pollution, coastal development, and, since 1989, a naturally occurring oyster disease have all but destroyed the industry. Today about 40,000 bushels are harvested yearly.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6842
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before pollution and overharvesting all but wiped out the state's oysters, commercial oyster harvesters brought in almost one million bushels a year. Now the harvest is less than 50,000 bushels. Loss of oysters is not only a problem for seafood lovers. It also means a loss of cleaner waters, for oysters filter water for their food. New legislation passed in 2004 now allows dock owners to cultivate their own oysters for consumption. The Under the Dock Oyster Bill states that \"shellfish cultivation provides increased ecological benefits to the estuarine environment by promoting natural water filtration and increased fishery habitats.\"
Full Text:
Record #:
28790
Author(s):
Abstract:
The partnership between oyster fishermen and scientists is a unique one. The Sandbar Oyster Company and the Institute of Marine Sciences of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill work together with local knowledge with scientific knowledge and data to harvest and study North Carolina’s oysters. Their partnership is good for business, education, and research.
Source:
Record #:
29891
Abstract:
Oyster tongs, large wooden tongs with metal rakes, were used to gather oysters and pull them out of shallow waters. In the winter, when fishing was not always lucrative, oysters could be harvested with just a boat and some tongs. Up to 20 bushels a day could sell for up to $800 for the season.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p50-51, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
31674
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rose Bay Oyster House is one of about twenty shucking houses in North Carolina, and the only one in the state that has its own oyster beds. Henderson Miles, a manager of the Rose Bay company, discusses oyster harvesting and some of the problems facing the oyster industry. According to Jim Brown of the Division of Commercial and Sports Fisheries, some of the problems are pollution and the lack of substrate for oysters to live.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Aug 1974, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34476
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a segment of an oral history with Alton Taylor, who recalls catching oysters for sale. Descriptions of his family’s boat and oystering locations are also included.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Summer 1992, p9, il, por
Record #:
34477
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article describes vernacular oyster dredge manufacture by Mr. Closs Harvey on the Outer Banks in the 1930s. Dredges were made of steel rods joined with a hand-cranked forge. Images of the dredges are included.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Summer 1992, p10, il, por
Record #:
35732
Author(s):
Abstract:
Megivern proposed that Tom Wright Jr. played a prominent role in making Wilmington a must see for NC’s coast travelers. That was done chiefly by his crowning achievement, Chandler’s Wharf. It bore evidence of the town’s maritime history in watercraft such the Harry W. Adams. For those seeking historic landmarks on land, there were sites such as the oldest building, now housing a nautical library, and an 1883 cooper’s home that became a restaurant.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p64-65