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211 results for The Researcher
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Record #:
4509
Abstract:
Scherman recounts his search into the life of Elizabeth Oakes Smith, a nationally known writer and advocate for women's rights during the 19th-century. Smith lived with her son, Appleton Oaksmith, in Carteret County during the latter part of her life and died there in 1893. She is buried in Patchogue, Long Island.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1998, p4-13, il, por, bibl, f
Record #:
4510
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the evening of September 26, 1961, the tanker POTOMAC exploded as it was unloading four and a half million gallons of fuel at the State Port in Morehead City. Numerous fire departments responded. Two sailors were killed. The fire burned for five days and could be seen from thirty miles away. Only the heroic efforts of the firemen, who hosed down tanks containing millions of gallons of aviation fuel and standing 550 feet from the fire, kept the disaster from becoming even greater.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1998, p28-29, il
Record #:
4512
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Clawson, born in Sweden, and Mary O'Donovan, born in Ireland, met and married in Beaufort, NC in the late 19th-century. They raised a family of six and started a prosperous business, Clawson's Grocery and Bakery. The business closed in 1934, and the building passed through several owners. The building was purchased in the late 1970s and opened as Clawson's Restaurant, one of Carteret County's most popular eating establishments.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 1998, p4-7, il, por
Record #:
4511
Author(s):
Abstract:
Appleton Oaksmith's life was one adventure after another - sea captain, suspected slaver, Civil War blockade runner, law fugitive, agent for foreign countries, and North Carolina state legislator. He settled in Carteret County in 1873 and was active in county business and political affairs.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1998, p20-29, il, por, f
Record #:
4513
Abstract:
Confederate spy Emeline Jamison Pigott was the most famous of the seven Pigott sisters, who were born in Carteret County between 1828 and 1842. Pitts reconstructs some of the family's history to show contributions made by the other sisters to Carteret County's heritage.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 1998, p8-11
Record #:
5095
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 19th-century armies, disease often claimed more casualties than the battlefield. Johnston uses the Fifteenth Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, which was the Provost Guard in New Bern in 1864, to show how disease can decimate a military unit. In this instance a rare outbreak of yellow fever killed 60 members of the regiment. In all, 303 Union soldiers died; the Fifteenth Connecticut accounted for 20 percent of them.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Winter 2000, p6-9, il, f
Record #:
5609
Abstract:
Episcopal minister David D. Van Antwerp organized Beaufort's Parish of St. Paul's in the mid-1850s and shortly thereafter began missionary efforts to local Afro-Americans. He met with opposition, but continued his work, as did subsequent pastors. In 1887, St. Clement's Colored Episcopal Church was built. The church continued until 1967, when it united with the congregation at St. Paul's.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 13 Issue 1-4, 1997, p10-12
Record #:
5607
Author(s):
Abstract:
The influenza epidemic of 1918-1921 killed millions worldwide. In Carteret County many fell sick, and 450 died. County ordinances forbade social gatherings to stop the disease's spread. Schools and churches closed, as did the local movie theater. Most victims survived through the heroic efforts of nurses, doctors, including Duncan, Lofton, Siske, Swindell, and Royal, and community volunteers.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 13 Issue 1-4, 1997, p4-7, il
Record #:
5608
Abstract:
The author's father, Earl Francis O'Boyle, a U.S. Navy radio operator, was assigned to the Cape Lookout Direction Finders Station in 1938. Gentry recounts some of her parents' experiences while living on the cape from May 1938 to May 1941, when the Navy closed all Direction Finders Stations from Maine to California.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 13 Issue 1-4, 1997, p8-9
Subject(s):
Record #:
6820
Abstract:
North Carolina has had many memorable hurricanes, including Hazel, Diane, and Floyd; but the '33 Storm, as it is called, seems to top them all. The storm struck Carteret County on September 15, 1933. It lingered at least twelve hours, with gusts at 120 to 140 miles per hour. The massive storm spawned many tornadoes, and at its height, over half of Carteret County was under water. Carraway describes the storm and includes a listing of each Down East town and the damage it sustained.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Winter 2003, p3-6, il
Record #:
7912
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many people have heard of Fairleigh Dickinson University, and the third-largest medical products and equipment industry in the world, Becton-Dickinson. Fewer people know that Fairleigh Dickinson was born in Carteret County in the Core Creek community. He left home at fourteen to take a job on a sailing ship. Later a chance meeting with Maxwell Becton of Kinston led to the founding of Becton-Dickinson, which reported revenues of almost $5 million in 2004. Although he led a very busy life filled with national and international commitments, Dickinson and his family returned to Core Creek every year till his death in 1948.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p16-18, il, por, bibl
Record #:
7913
Author(s):
Abstract:
A severe hurricane struck Carteret County with wind gusts in excess of 150 miles per hour on August 18, 1879. William B. Duncan wrote several letters to his son Thomas Isaac Duncan about the effects of the storm. The letters provide an eyewitness account of the storm's damage.
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Record #:
7918
Author(s):
Abstract:
On September 15 and 16, 1933, a severe hurricane struck Carteret County with destructive winds and heavy rains. Beveridge recounts the effects of the storm, providing an eyewitness account of the storm's fury.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2005, p7-8
Record #:
34470
Author(s):
Abstract:
The second article in a series addressing hospitals in Morehead City, this installment focuses on the second hospital constructed after WWI and in use through the 1970s. Topics covered include architecture, hospital resources and staff, and finances. There is also an in-depth discussion of the hospital’s use during WWII.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p3-6, il
Record #:
34474
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carteret County Historical Society houses reproductions of drawings of Roanoke Island made by John White in 1585. White studied the Algonquin and Tuscarora Indians, and the subjects he depicted include fishing and agricultural practices, burial customs, personal adornment, and village construction. Scans of the drawings are included.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p9-10, il