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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Williamson, Sonny
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Record #:
34466
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Abstract:
In February 1905, the schooner SARAH D.J. RAWSON wrecked offshore of the Cape Lookout Life-Saving Station on route to New York City with a cargo of lumber. The article details the rescue of the crew, for which the Life-Saving personnel received Congressional recognition.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 7 Issue 3, October 1991, p3, 7-10, il
Record #:
34471
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article addresses the history and use of the sailing sharpie CHASE, destroyed in a 1933 hurricane. The brief article includes vessel dimensions and general use.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p7, il
Record #:
34481
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cape Lookout has long been a notable landmark for mariners due to the area’s rough shoals and the natural deep-water harbor. The Cape Lookout Lighthouse was constructed in 1812 and remains in use. This article presents a brief history of the lighthouse and surrounding waters.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 4, Fall 1992, p4-5
Record #:
34477
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article describes vernacular oyster dredge manufacture by Mr. Closs Harvey on the Outer Banks in the 1930s. Dredges were made of steel rods joined with a hand-cranked forge. Images of the dredges are included.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Summer 1992, p10, il, por
Record #:
34488
Author(s):
Abstract:
Williamson details a letter from Mr. Daniel Bryan Dickinson to the County Superintendent for school services rendered from 1883. The original letter is included with Williamson’s notes.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Spring 1993, p8
Record #:
34497
Author(s):
Abstract:
The barkentine OLIVE THURLOW was passing Cape Lookout on route to New York when its captain, Jerry Hayes, broke his leg. Seeking medical attention from the nearby lifesaving station, the lighthouse keeper warned the THURLOW’s crew that a storm was approaching. While the Captain was taken to Beaufort for medical attention, the ship and crew were grounded on the beach. This account details their rescue and the demise of OLIVE THURLOW, including the later discovery of archaeological remains.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Fall 1993, p3-5
Record #:
34515
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a reprint of an 1810 letter describing Beaufort written by Jacob Henry, a Jewish County representative in the State General Assembly. Henry discusses the town’s shipbuilding, whaling, and fishing industries, as well as points of interest for tourists.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p8-9
Record #:
34655
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drawing on primary accounts, this article addresses the cruise of the Confederate blockade runner CSS NASHVILLE between October 1861 and February 1862. Beginning in Bermuda, NASHVILLE sailed for Beaufort, NC and encountered Union ships outside the harbor. Using a false flag, NASHVILLE passed by the enemy vessel. The Union sailors soon discovered the ruse and began firing at the blockade runner. NASHVILLE successfully evaded the shots and sought cover at Fort Macon, proceeding to Morehead City. Various other vessels saw the encounter and commented on the skill of the crew. NASHVILLE was eventually sold for private use.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p19-23, il
Record #:
34689
Author(s):
Abstract:
A hurricane struck the North Carolina coast in 1750, wreaking havoc on various vessels and coastal communities. During the storm, five Spanish vessels including the Nuestra Senora de Solidad were wrecked near Currituck Inlet, Drum Inlet, and Topsail Inlet. Other vessels were reported sunk at Cape Hatteras, and Ocracoke. In many instances, the cargoes were brought to shore and the crews sought aid from colonists in Norfolk, Virginia.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Winter 2003, p10-11, il
Record #:
34709
Author(s):
Abstract:
In early November 1861, French Man-of-War PRONY was stranded near Ocracoke Inlet. Catching sight of the vessel, the master of USS UNDERWRITER sent message they would provide aid. Unable to reach the vessel, however, UNDERWRITER retreated leaving PRONY vulnerable to attack. Confederate forces arrived on the scene and instead of attacking, offered assistance. While PRONY was not rescued, the crew were taken onboard CSS CURLEW and brought to New Bern.
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Record #:
34740
Author(s):
Abstract:
In January 1862, the Irish ship YORK wrecked near Bogue Inlet. USS ALBATROSS was patrolling the coast at the time, and discovered the vessel unloading its cargo with help from Confederate troops. Historic sources indicate another vessel was also on shore at the time, leading the commander of USS ALBATROSS to suggest the vessels were wrecked by Confederate sources. Contemporary Confederate accounts indicate there was an interest in salvaging iron from both vessels. The crews were taken and imprisoned at Fort Macon.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2005, p15, il
Record #:
34744
Author(s):
Abstract:
In February 1862, two Beaufort residents successfully ran the Union blockade of Beaufort on board the CSS NASHVILLE. Used for transporting goods, NASHVILLE would continue to serve as a blockade runner for Confederate forces. In March, NASHVILLE transported arms and munitions across the blockade at the Cape Fear River; sailed into Nassau, and successfully bypassed Union sailors at the port of Georgetown, South Carolina.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p5-6, il
Record #:
34755
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Second World War, government contracts and employment greatly increased the standard of living in the communities of Sea Level, Atlantic, and Cherry Point. As household goods and staples were rationed, some families decided to invest in real estate, moving to Pine Ridge. The author recalls one man, Mr. Denard, deciding to move his entire house to the burgeoning community. Using heavy cables, the house was lifted onto rollers and carted off.
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Record #:
34753
Author(s):
Abstract:
In April 1864, Confederate forces attached the Cape Lookout Lighthouse. The subsequent reports stated both lighthouses at Cape Lookout were destroyed “so they can never be repaired again.” This, in fact, was not the case. The older 1812 lighthouse had been damaged but was not in use during the time of the attack. The newer lighthouse, built 1859, had only suffered damage to the lens and stairs. Within a short time, the 1859 light was returned to working order.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p11, il
Record #:
35020
Author(s):
Abstract:
The third in a series of relatively unknown oceanic escapades that took place during the early Civil War focused on the maritime blockades by Beaufort natives Captain John Beveridge and Josiah Pender, as well as Harker’s Island natives Matthew Goodring and Lieutenant Whittle. While in command of the CSS Nashville, Beveridge and Pender successfully executed four blockades in 1862. That same year, Goodring and Whittle had one successful blockade.
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