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45 results for New Bern--History
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Record #:
4068
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John Lawson, surveyor and explorer of North Carolina, had close ties with New Bern and its founder, Baron von Graffenried. He guided the first settlers to the city's site and later assisted the baron in laying out the city and negotiating with the Indians. Lawson was killed by Indians soon after. In New Bern today, a creek, park, street, and bridge bear his name.
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Record #:
4220
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Over the years a number of New Bern women have had an impact on the town, state, and nation. Emeline Pigott spied for the South during the Union occupation. Bayard Wootten became one of the 20th-century's most outstanding photographers. Charlotte Rhone was the state's first black registered nurse. Minnette Chapman Duffy organized the New Bern Historical Society in 1923.
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Record #:
4960
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Turnage gives a brief look at what was happening in New Bern, Beaufort, and Bath on the eve of the American Revolution.
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Record #:
5095
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In 19th-century armies, disease often claimed more casualties than the battlefield. Johnston uses the Fifteenth Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, which was the Provost Guard in New Bern in 1864, to show how disease can decimate a military unit. In this instance a rare outbreak of yellow fever killed 60 members of the regiment. In all, 303 Union soldiers died; the Fifteenth Connecticut accounted for 20 percent of them.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Winter 2000, p6-9, il, f
Record #:
6188
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New Bern, in Craven County, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. Comer takes the reader on a tour of the town that was the state's first capital and that is the state's second oldest city.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 6, Nov 2003, p18-20, 22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8974
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Reverend Canon Patricius Cleery of Ireland came to New Bern about 1784 to settle his brother's estate. After a yellow fever epidemic broke out, Cleery never returned to Ireland, but stayed to offer relief to residents of New Bern. He fell victim to the illness himself and died in 1790. He was buried on the grounds of New Bern's Christ Episcopal Church. A new cross has recently been added to his tombstone to replace the original wooden one placed there the year of his death.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p22, il
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Record #:
9277
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On September 7, 1970, a hurricane struck New Bern, destroying homes and businesses and flooding much of the town. Seven people were killed by flying debris or flood waters. New Bern recovered almost entirely within fifteen months of the storm.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 8, Jan 1979, p14-15, 23, il
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Record #:
9316
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In February 1813, the Virginia Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church met in New Bern. One of the speakers, Reverend Jesse Lee of Virginia, spoke of how the world had been turned upside down after the fall in the Garden of Eden. The next day, much to everyone's enjoyment, it was discovered that local pranksters had gone through the town and turned everything upside down from mailboxes and street signs to boats and wagons.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p23, il
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Record #:
12368
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Encompassing 725 square miles, Craven County was first settled in 1710 by Baron de Graffenried and the German and Swiss colonists that pursued him. A region plagued by the Tuscarora War, Craven's image improved when the second oldest city in North Carolina, New Bern, was appointed the colonial state capital. Commerce throughout the region grew via the expansion of maritime industries, agriculture, and improvements in transportation. Cherry Point serves as the biggest modern contribution to Craven's economy, generating some 35% of all trade.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 23, Apr 1958, p16-32, il, map, f
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Record #:
12367
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In a few months, restored Tryon Palace in New Bern, will become one of the most visited places in North Carolina. A gift to the people from Mrs. Maude Moore Latham, the restoration project will cost upwards of $2 million dollars.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 23, Apr 1958, p15, il
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Record #:
12953
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Occurring June 11 through 25, residents of New Bern will be celebrating the 250th anniversary of North Carolina's second oldest city.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 26, May 1960, p7, 35, il
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Record #:
13783
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Young William Tryon's letters indicate that perhaps his gift of a North Carolina panther moved the King of England to approve his plans for the New Bern Capitol building.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p8, 24, il
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Record #:
15655
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deLue, the travel editor of the Boston Globe, continues his trip through eastern North Carolina, this time stopping in the historic city of New Bern. Here he discovered that New Bern's well-known William Gaston was of the same family branch of the Boston, Massachusetts Gastons. He also described for his readers some of the city's sights and history.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 10, Oct 1955, p15-16, il
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Record #:
15697
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The 300th anniversary of New Bern was celebrated in grand form at the not yet opened N.C. History center. Many historically significant artifacts were on display for the grand celebration including North Carolina's copy of the Bill of Rights and the Elizabeth II sailed from Roanoke Island Festival Park.
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Record #:
19782
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This is a reprint of correspondence between the Ritter Company, Franz (or Frantz) Ludwig Michel, and others in the projected Swiss and Palatine colonies. The letters date between 1703 and 1708 which predate Christoph Baron von Graffenried's expedition to North Carolina by about 10 years. According to Schutz's introduction, the letters address the period in which Michel was sent to North Carolina by the Canton of Bern to find a tract of land for Swiss settlement and later negotiated for the Canton of Bern and the Ritter Company, a silver mining and Swiss Anabaptist settlement venture, to acquire land in North Carolina and Virginia.
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