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9 results for Hospitals--History
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Record #:
3137
Author(s):
Abstract:
Because of a need to provide medical care to seriously ill seamen on the Outer Banks, Congress authorized construction of the state's first hospital. It was built between 1846 and 1847 in the town of Portsmouth, on Portsmouth Island.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 6, Oct 1996, p6-9, il
Record #:
28026
Author(s):
Abstract:
The St. Luke’s Hospital School of Nursing operated in New Bern, North Carolina from 1915 until the mid-1930s. St. Luke’s typified the American training school during that time, however, its high standard of education was exceptional. Graduates were able to adapt and succeed as the nursing profession moved into the modern era.
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Record #:
28027
Author(s):
Abstract:
St. Luke’s Hospital was owned and operated by two young physicians, R. Duval Jones and Joseph F. Patterson, in New Bern, North Carolina during the early twentieth century. The owners described their facility as one of the most modern hospitals in the South. The complete St. Luke’s brochure is reproduced in this journal issue, offering details of the hospital’s design, construction, equipment, operations, and staff.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
34470
Author(s):
Abstract:
The second article in a series addressing hospitals in Morehead City, this installment focuses on the second hospital constructed after WWI and in use through the 1970s. Topics covered include architecture, hospital resources and staff, and finances. There is also an in-depth discussion of the hospital’s use during WWII.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p3-6, il
Record #:
34467
Author(s):
Abstract:
Morehead’s first hospital was established in 1911 and replaced in 1918. This article discusses the hospital personnel, facilities, successes, and circumstances behind the hospital’s closure.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 1, January 1992, p3, 18-21, il
Record #:
34500
Author(s):
Abstract:
In November 1953, the Sea Level Community Hospital was formally dedicated by the Taylor family. Constructed to serve isolated communities in the Outer Banks, the hospital dedication was also a homecoming for hospital benefactors. This article details hospital construction, facilities, and the Taylor family.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Fall 1993, p13-15
Record #:
34597
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ben Royal was the doctor responsible for Morehead City’s first hospital. A local resident, Royal attended the University of North Carolina and returned to Morehead City in 1910, where he established the 8-bed hospital two years later. Dr. Royal and his assistant, Edith Broadway, were the only two hospital staff for the first decade of its service. In 1918, Royal again opened a larger 28-bed hospital in Morehead City to meet growing demands. As the hospital served residents located throughout the Outer Banks, the larger hospital had an associated pier to assist in transport. During the Second World War, over 300 victims were treated by Royal and his staff.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Summer 1999, p8-10, il, por
Record #:
34686
Abstract:
A graduate of the University of North Carolina, Dr. Ben Royal worked as a physician and surgeon in Morehead City. During the Second World War, Dr. Royal anticipated increased use of hospital facilities and was responsible for the installation of a 32 bed emergency wing. This wing continued to function until 1967. Dr. Royal himself worked in Morehead City from 1911 to 1962.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spring 2003, p10, il, por
Record #:
34792
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Ben Royal started the first Morehead City hospital with support from the U.S. Public Health Service and local community members. Edith Broadway was hired as a nurse in 1912 to assist with operations. Her work, however, far exceeded her title. Broadway and Royal worked tirelessly to assist residents of Morehead City and surrounding areas; beginning with only seven beds, the duo worked to expand service to eighteen patients. Following the flu epidemic of 1918, Royal and Broadway continued to raise funds for a larger, more adequate facility. Their work manifested in a new building and improved medical facilities. The two worked side by side through the Second World War. Overall, Broadway dedicated 31 years to the Morehead City hospitals.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010, p11-13, il, por