NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


43 results for Tributaries
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
1941
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pender County middle school students and state archaeologists researched the muddy wreck of what was thought to be the ship SYLVAN GROVE. By studying yellowed newspaper articles and old photographs, the researchers discovered the true name of the vessel.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Oct 1991, p1-7, il
Record #:
1942
Author(s):
Abstract:
Discovery in 1989 of a flatboat in a Trent River meander near New Bern gave insight into the building and use of an important transportation mode, the ferry in colonial North Carolina.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Oct 1991, p10-16, il, f
Record #:
1963
Author(s):
Abstract:
Life in the naval stores industry of 19th-century North Carolina is documented in a pictorial series.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p12-15, il
Record #:
1971
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many unknown travelers, explorers, and artifacts from the 1500s and 1600s lie buried off the coasts of North Carolina and other coastal states. Underwater archaeology could assist in bringing information about this period to light.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p22-25, f
Record #:
1972
Author(s):
Abstract:
A process that has been used by foresters and the timber industry is now a valuable tool in assisting historians in precisely dating old houses and maritime artifacts.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p26-29, il, f
Record #:
1966
Author(s):
Abstract:
Structures related to shallow river navigation, such as wing dams and sluice walls, are depicted in this photographic essay.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 3, Oct 1993, p17-19, il
Record #:
2177
Author(s):
Abstract:
After the Civil War, the independent lifestyles of Outer Banks citizens began to change as business interests, such as commercial fishing, moved to the area in competition with traditional cottage industries, such as boat building and net making.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p14-19, il
Record #:
2193
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prior to 1662 there were no accurate maps of the Carolina coast from Cape Lookout to Port Royal Sound. Six voyages of exploration between 1662 and 1667 added detailed descriptions of previously unknown areas to existing maps.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p21-29, il, f
Record #:
2194
Author(s):
Abstract:
President Thomas Jefferson viewed the Navy as a defensive agency that should use small, two-cannon ships. Use of these vessels in North Carolina's treacherous coastal waters validated his gunboat program philosophy.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p30-35, il, f
Record #:
2628
Author(s):
Abstract:
Schooners figured prominently in the state's water commerce during the 18th and 19th Centuries. Records of the S. R. Fowle Company of Washington provide important information on the use of these vessels for commerce.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 5, Oct 1995, p22-27, il, f
Record #:
2629
Author(s):
Abstract:
Development of watercraft that worked the state's coastal waters during then 19th-century is documented in a pictorial series.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 5, Oct 1995, p28-32, il
Record #:
2643
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since people began settling near it in the early 1700s, New Topsail Inlet has witnessed commerce passing, ships sinking, wars, and now extensive recreational development.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 5, Oct 1995, p15-21, il, f
Record #:
3138
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hatteras Inlet is distinguished from other coastal inlets in that it has had two locations during its history. The first, depicted on a 1738 chart, was not shown in 1764. The second was created in 1846 by a storm.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 6, Oct 1996, p10-15, il, f
Record #:
3137
Author(s):
Abstract:
Because of a need to provide medical care to seriously ill seamen on the Outer Banks, Congress authorized construction of the state's first hospital. It was built between 1846 and 1847 in the town of Portsmouth, on Portsmouth Island.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 6, Oct 1996, p6-9, il
Record #:
3702
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard the pirate was the terror of the coast during the early 18th-century. He was killed near Ocracoke in 1718. A shipwreck found off Beaufort Inlet on November 21, 1996, is thought to be his flagship QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 7, Oct 1997, p30-39, il, f