NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for North Carolina--History--World War, 1939-1945
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1408
Author(s):
Abstract:
In November, 1993, World War II veterans returned to Fort Fisher and the site of now-vanished Camp Davis, at Holly Ridge, to observe the fiftieth anniversary of their anti-aircraft and artillery training.
Source:
Record #:
1584
Author(s):
Abstract:
Camp Davis, located on the southern coast between Wilmington and present-day Topsail Island, was an important U.S. military installation in the years just before and during U.S. involvement in World War II.
Source:
Record #:
3720
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, based at Camp Mackall in Scotland County in 1943, had a champion baseball team. When they played again in 1945, many members had been lost in the Normandy Invasion, Holland, and the Battle of the Bulge.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4466
Author(s):
Abstract:
The outbreak of World War II placed Robert Ruark's writing career on hold. Enlisting in the Navy, Ruark served in the Armed Guard aboard merchant ships transporting supplies to the Allies. Glover chronicles some of Ruark's wartime experiences and summarizes his postwar writing career, which included the novels Something of Value, Uhuru, and Poor No More.
Source:
Lower Cape Fear Historical Society Bulletin (NoCar F 262 C2 L6x), Vol. 44 Issue 1, Oct 1999, p1-15, por, bibl, f
Full Text:
Record #:
5990
Author(s):
Abstract:
The outbreak of World War II caught the United States short of cargo ships to send vital war supplies to the Allies, along with a means to protect them. Knapp discusses shipbuilding in the state during the war, particularly in Wilmington where 243 ships were constructed. He also discusses the blimp station in Weeksville in Pasquotank County, where the lighter-than-air aircraft that patrolled the Atlantic for submarines were based.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
17147
Abstract:
Certain recent events have been tests for the American populations, and foreshadow the extent of their willingness to participate in World War II. The first test of the machinery of civilian defense co-ordination was foreshadowed in the nation in the passage of the Selective Service Act. The second test of civilian defense in North Carolina began with the forerunners of army maneuvers. The third test began with the bombing Pearl Harbor.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Jan 1942, p2, f
Record #:
17157
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor J. Melville Broughton provides a program of action for the home front as offices and seamen launch on the U.S.S NORTH CAROLINA. North Carolinians along with the Institute of Government and other North Carolina institutions will work together to focus on public water supplies, wartime and emergency duties of police, and public purchasing and financing, while a large portion of North Carolinians are away at war.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Feb 1942, p3, 11, f
Record #:
24611
Author(s):
Abstract:
During World War II, David Finley, the first director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. needed a sanctuary for the fine art in the gallery. Finley turned to his friend Edith Vanderbilt, who willingly agreed to hide these rare pieces of art at the Biltmore Estate. Painstaking effort ensured that the pieces were hidden and stored in a room with steel vaulted doors and steel barred windows. Some pieces kept at the Biltmore included Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of George Washington, Raphael’s Portrait of Bindo Altoviti, and Titian’s Venus with a Mirror.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p40-42, 44, 46-47, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
16152
Author(s):
Abstract:
During World War II, the state was home to more servicemen than any other state because due in part to the large bases within North Carolina. Taxes helped with expenses but citizens were encouraged to buy War Bonds to finance the effort. Bond sellers encouraged residents to purchase these bonds with enticements of seeing a captured Japanese Submarine in Wake County or by having a war plane named for their county (Rutherford).
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
16154
Abstract:
Out of approximately 370,000 German POWs on U.S. soil, the state held 10,000 in eighteen camps. These camps were simply tents surrounded by barbed-wire fencing and watchtowers and were located in Pender, Onslow, Richmond, Scotland, Union, and New Hanover Counties.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
10517
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early days of World War II, German submarines sank Allied ships within sight of the North Carolina coast. Duffus recounts incidents from the dark days of 1942, when German U-Boats ruled the seas off North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Spring 2008, p22-24, il, por
Record #:
30021
Abstract:
In the midst of the United States' involvement in World War II, North Carolina's Governor discusses the rights and responsibilities of citizens during this time. Some of the responsibilities include farm labor and civilian defense.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 1 Issue 4, August 1943, p2-3, 24-25, por
Record #:
34470
Author(s):
Abstract:
The second article in a series addressing hospitals in Morehead City, this installment focuses on the second hospital constructed after WWI and in use through the 1970s. Topics covered include architecture, hospital resources and staff, and finances. There is also an in-depth discussion of the hospital’s use during WWII.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p3-6, il