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19 results for Fort Fisher (New Hanover County)
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Record #:
1408
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In November, 1993, World War II veterans returned to Fort Fisher and the site of now-vanished Camp Davis, at Holly Ridge, to observe the fiftieth anniversary of their anti-aircraft and artillery training.
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Record #:
10847
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Colonel William Lamb assumed command of Ft. Fisher on July 4, 1862, a post he held until the fort's downfall in January of 1865. His first-hand account of those years was given in an address and published by the Wilmington Messenger in 1893. Summarized in the article, Lamb's address has also been reprinted recently by the Blockade Runner Museum in Carolina Beach.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 10, Oct 1967, p8-10, il, map
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Record #:
12076
Abstract:
At 1:40 am, 23 December 1864, the Louisiana, loaded with 215 tons of black powder, accidently exploded, foiling Union General Benjamin \"Beast\" Butler's intentions of destroying the Confederate stronghold, Fort Fisher.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 5, July 1956, p9-10, 27, il
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Record #:
12812
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Work on a restoration project of Fort Fisher has started on a 180-acre tract of land, held by the state of North Carolina under lease from the Federal Government. Long range plans call for clearing the site, building a visitor center and museum, creating trails, erecting markers, and restoring several segments of the fort, such as gun mounts and underground magazines. Of critical importance to the Confederacy for protection of shipping in and out of Wilmington, Fort Fisher was subjected to the biggest naval bombardment of any land position in history, falling into Union control in 1865.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 10, Oct 1960, p11, il
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Record #:
12919
Abstract:
Fort Fisher, located at the convergence of the Cape Fear River and Atlantic Ocean, is an area also known as Federal Point or Confederate Point. A key position and fortification for Southern militia during the Civil War, the location ultimately fell to Union forces on 15 January 1865. The end of the Civil War closely followed this event, overshadowing impending repercussions that are often overlooked. The loss of Ft. Fisher opened the Confederacy up to attacks along the Cape Fear as well as the loss of Wilmington, known as the great importing depot of the South.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 2, June 1959, p13-14, il
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Record #:
14759
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Abstract:
Few women rendered more loyal service to the Confederate cause, made greater sacrifices or endured more severe hardships than did Sara Annie \"Daisy\" Chaffee Lamb.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 26, Nov 1944, p1, 21
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Record #:
15910
Abstract:
Fort Fisher Restoration Committee provided the necessary funds and energy to update Fort Fisher Historic Site, North Carolina's most visited site. June 1, 2002, new exhibits were dedicated which highlights the battle for Fort Fisher, one of the Civil War's final engagements between North and South. One exemplary piece, included installation of an interactive map through which visitors could track progress of battle.
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Record #:
19358
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On the southernmost tip of New Hanover County, a narrow strip of land bordered by the Cape Fear River on one side and that Atlantic on the other, holds the Confederate constructed Fort Fisher. Only the last battle took place over 125 years ago, Fort Fisher is still under attack, this time by the relentless bombarding of the sea and erosion that threatens to sink it into the ocean.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 16 Issue 9, Oct 1989, p2-3, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
19482
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Abstract:
Going to the beach often means sun and sand, but at Fort Fisher, visitors can walk with history at the American Civil War fort.
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Record #:
21302
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Major-General William H.C. Whiting was the district commander at Wilmington, and in 1864, General Braxton Bragg was sent to take over his duties. In January 1865, Union forces launched their attack on Fort Fisher and in a few days captured it. Pleasants examines two options that Bragg had that might have saved the fort and \"concluded that General Bragg was the major culprit behind the fiasco\" that cost the Confederates their coastal stronghold.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 5 Issue 2, Nov 1999, p5-7, il, bibl
Record #:
4893
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fort Fisher, built twenty miles south of Wilmington on the Cape Fear River at the start of the Civil War, was the largest and strongest earthwork fort in the world. As the Union blockade slowly closed all Southern ports, the fort was vital in keeping the river open to allow blockade runners to bring in supplies. Several times the Union tried top capture it and failed. On January 15, 1865, Fort Fisher finally fell to an overwhelming Northern force. Over 2,000 men were killed or wounded during the battle.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p28-31, il
Record #:
28161
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fort Fisher offers a unique example of military architecture and fortification. Called the “Malakoff of the South,” Fort Fisher had formidable defenses for a seaward assault, which helped in protecting Confederate blockade runners.
Record #:
28199
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From 1907 to 1910, many politicians and Civil War veterans that served during the siege of Fort Fisher urged a Congressional subcommittee to allocate funds to provide for a national park to commemorate this decisive event in Civil War history.
Record #:
28571
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Good fishing can be found at most of the state parks in North Carolina. The best places to fish, the type of fish stocked at each park, and the best times of year to fish are described for 12 state parks. The fishing at Lake Norman, New River, South Mountains, Jordan Lake, Kerr Lake, Morrow Mountain, Fort Fisher, Fort Macon, Merchants Millpond, Pettigrew, Hanging Rock, and Eno River State Parks are all detailed. Hanging Rock, Eno River, and Fort Macon are highlighted with anecdotes and advice from parks employees and local fishing experts.
Record #:
32242
Author(s):
Abstract:
After a failed marriage and unhappy with working, Robert Harrell decided to move onto state owned property at Fort Fisher, NC and live off the land. With an abandoned WWI pillbox as his shelter, Harrell lived primarily off of crabs and shellfish. With a popular following and ever-increasing number of visitors, Harrell has become one of the most popular attractions in NC.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 13, Nov 1958, p24, por
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