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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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Record #:
21196
Abstract:
Sergeant William McBryar was born in Elizabethtown in Bladen County in 1861, and at age 25, enlisted in the 10th U.S. Cavalry. He was a sergeant in Company K. For actions against the Apache Indians on March 7, 1890 at Salt River, Arizona, he was nominated for and received the Medal of Honor. He was later promoted to lieutenant and was in the Spanish-American War and Philippine-American War. After he retired, he was a watchman at Arlington Cemetery, a prison guard, and a school teacher at Newton Grove and other places. McBryar died in 1941 and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 2 Issue 2, Oct 1996, p1-2, por
Record #:
21197
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ripley recounts the organization, training, battles, and demobilization of the 30th Infantry Division in World War I. Components of the Division were drawn from National Guard units, and half of the Division came from North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Some units, including the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd NC Infantry Regiments, had just returned home from Federal service on the Mexican Border during 1916-1917. When it came time to choose a nickname for the Division, the Southern soldiers suggested President Andrew Jackson's, and the Division officially was known as the \"Old Hickory Division.\"
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 1, May 1997, p8-12, il, map
Record #:
21189
Abstract:
John Henry Cooper left his wife, family, and job in Raleigh to fight for the Confederacy. He joined the 3rd Regiment NC Artillery, but was later transferred to Lt. Col. John Haskell's Company F, 13th Battalion, NC Light Infantry, where he served for the war. The authors used historical records to document this company's movements and thereby surmise the conditions under which Cooper and others like him served and suffered.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Jul 1995, punnumbered, por
Record #:
21195
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rufus Geddie Herring of Roseboro in Sampson County is North Carolina's only Navy Medal of Honor recipient in World War II. He received the medal for action during the pre-invasion of Iwo Jima. Ripley's article describes the action and also includes Herring's Medal of Honor Citation, which was signed by President Truman.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Apr 1996, p1-3, por
Record #:
21190
Abstract:
Davis, author, lecturer, and coordinator of the Family & Regional History Program at Wallace State College in Alabama, shares a compilation of his lecture notes on doing research in military records beyond the Civil War. These include the Colonial Wars, 1607-1775; American Revolution, 1775-1783; Military Service, 1784-1917; and 1918 to the Present.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Oct 1995, p1, 6-7
Record #:
21191
Abstract:
Winton, located in Hertford County, was the first North Carolina town burned during the Civil War. The following two accounts of the destruction come from the papers of Burnside and Hawkins.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Oct 1995, p12
Record #:
21213
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brockman was born in Greensboro in December, 1895, and at age 101, he is one of the few living North Carolinians who served in the war. He joined an ambulance company being organized by the Greensboro Chapter of the American Red Cross, and it was sworn into the Army in June 1917. The company, now called Ambulance Company No. 321, joined the 81st \"Wildcat\" Division, which included many North Carolinians. Brockman arrived in France on August 24, 1918, and the last battle the company took part in was the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. After the war, he settled in Greensboro where he worked with an office supply store.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 1, May 1997, p14, por
Record #:
21215
Author(s):
Abstract:
British forces made two attempts to control North and South Carolina during the first two years of the American Revolution. Both failed. From 1775 to 1778, the northern colonies bore the brunt of most of the major fighting. With fighting in the north stalemated late in 1778, British commanders again looked southward. Ripley recounts the fighting in the South up to 1781, much of which was a bitter, violent civil war between Tories and American militia, with little participation by British soldiers.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p1-5, por, map
Record #:
21214
Abstract:
Sergeant Corbett joined the 2nd NC Infantry in April 1915 and served on the Mexican Border during 1916-1917. On his return, he remained with the regiment when it was designated the 119th Infantry, 30th Division. He recorded in his diary a soldier's view of fighting at Bellicourt, France, and other scenes of action.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 1, May 1997, p15-16
Record #:
21234
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, February 27, 1776, was a complete victory for the Patriots over the Scottish Highlanders and their Tory allies. It gave a tremendous morale boost to the other colonies. Desperately needed equipment was captured, including 35 guns, 1,500 excellent rifles, and medicine and surgical supplies. The Patriots also captured 800 prisoners. Significantly, the Patriot victory brought an end to royal rule in North Carolina.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p5-6, bibl
Record #:
21276
Abstract:
The partisan warfare that took place in North Carolina during the Revolutionary War is both fascinating and disturbing. However, it is beyond the range and scope of this article which concentrates on the people and events of the Upper Cape River Valley between 1781-1782. Harrington attempts \"to explain this significant historical event in terms of what it was, when and where it occurred, who participated and why, the nature of the conflict and, most importantly, its impact both on society in the near term as well as the subsequent history of the area.\"
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p9-14, map, bibl
Record #:
21275
Abstract:
General Martin D. Hardin of Kentucky spoke with Isaac Shelby in 1815 and again in 1819 about the Battle of King's Mountain. The notes he took were later communicated to the American Review in 1848 by his son John J. Hardin and are included in this article.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p7-9, por, map
Record #:
21283
Abstract:
At the beginning of the Civil War, Raleigh had a population of around 4,800 people. The city would become a center for the treatment of the sick and wounded, and the state's first military hospital was established there almost immediately after the outbreak of hostilities. Alexander provides a brief history of the hospitals with a focus on the famous Raleigh physician, Dr. E. Burke Haywood.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 4 Issue 1, June 1998, p9-10, il, bibl
Record #:
21286
Abstract:
At the Battle of Averasborough, fought in Harnett and Cumberland counties on March 16, 1865, a Union force of about 26,000 was opposed by 5,400 Confederates under the command of General William J. Hardee. Although the Confederates were defeated after a battle of a day and a half, they held Sherman's approaching mammoth army long enough to allow General Joseph J. Johnston to gather his forces for the Battle of Bentonville two days later.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 4 Issue 1, June 1998, p11-12, map
Record #:
21282
Abstract:
Peacock provides readers with a biographical account of the actions of Bryan Grimes during the Civil War. Grimes, the heroic colonel of the 4th NC Regiment State Troops and later a general, was from Pitt County and served the four war years. During the conflict he had seven horses shot out from under him.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 4 Issue 1, June 1998, p5-8, bibl