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11 results for Fishing, Recreational--North Carolina
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Record #:
19118
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Researchers are going straight to the source in an attempt to understand the growing economics of recreational fishing and declines in certain fish and shellfish populations in North Carolina waters--the sportsmen themselves.
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Record #:
23079
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Veteran Captain Richard Andrews appeals to tourists and locals with his description of summer fishing on the Pamlico. After explaining the importance of tourist fishing for the coastal economy, he provides a detailed account of the fish species that enter the Pamlico Sound and Pamlico River during the summer.
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Record #:
23103
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This article showcases the best field guides in the South, varying from those who specialize in hunting, fishing, and navigating the landscape. Three guides from North Carolina are featured, including Craig Byers from Weaverville, Matt Maness from Boone, and Seth Vernon from Wilmington.
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Record #:
23921
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Tarpons live and breed in the Florida Keys, but each summer they venture as far north as the Chesapeake Bay. In July, they populate the Pamlico Sound, providing anglers with a challenging but entertaining opportunity to chase these 100-pound fish.
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Record #:
23923
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From July through September, the elusive Giant Red Drum populates the Pamlico Sound. A strategic style of bait and line movement is necessary to catch these tricky fish.
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Record #:
26348
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Volunteer anglers and paddlers participated in a study to evaluate stream flow on the Catawba River and assess the effects on fishing potential. The results will be used as part of Duke Power’s licensing process to continue operation of Linville Dam hydropower facility.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Fall 2004, p1-3, il, por
Record #:
28571
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Good fishing can be found at most of the state parks in North Carolina. The best places to fish, the type of fish stocked at each park, and the best times of year to fish are described for 12 state parks. The fishing at Lake Norman, New River, South Mountains, Jordan Lake, Kerr Lake, Morrow Mountain, Fort Fisher, Fort Macon, Merchants Millpond, Pettigrew, Hanging Rock, and Eno River State Parks are all detailed. Hanging Rock, Eno River, and Fort Macon are highlighted with anecdotes and advice from parks employees and local fishing experts.
Record #:
30924
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Efforts at Carolina Beach, North Carolina are being made to bring deep sea fishing within the means of the public. This new installment plan has taken the form of the Deep Sea Fishing Club; anyone can become a member of this exclusive club by paying a $10 initiation fee and then paying $10 per month dues. This provides access to daily fishing with a guest, and plans are in the works for an ultra-modern floating clubhouse.
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Record #:
30929
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A family owned fish farm in Fayetteville, NC offers more than just fresh fish. The Stone family's 102 acre Cedar Creek Fish Farm offers farm raised catfish and tilapia, as well as seasonal offerings like live crabs, shrimp, oysters clams and frog legs.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , Jul/Aug 2016, p58-61, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
30988
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Farm ponds are one of North Carolina’s most valuable aquatic resources. A pond can serve as a water source for livestock, aid in fire protection, attract wildlife, and provide fishing opportunities. This article describes popular fish species, such as largemouth bass, bluegill, and channel catfish, and discusses fishing techniques and etiquette.
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Record #:
34894
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In this Ramblin’ Man column, author T. Edward Nickens recounts his adventure on a deep-sea charter out of Moreheard City, North Carolina. Fishing in the Gulf Stream off the coast of North Carolina results in large, colorful catches.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2017, p70-75, il, por Periodical Website
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