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58 results for Nickens, T. Edward
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Record #:
3810
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A powerful storm in 1846 carved Oregon Inlet through the Outer Banks. Now 2,500 feet wide, it is a place of turbulent waters and shifting sands. It is a mixed blessing, taking lives, yet providing ocean access for fishermen. A controversial plan to control the shifting inlet is construction of two 3,500-foot jetties.
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Record #:
3881
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Every fall for decades, fishermen have made the trek to the tip of Cape Hatteras. There, where the Gulf Stream and the Labrador Current surge by, is some of the best autumn fishing to be found.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1998, p6-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4022
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Many people drive over the Intracoastal Waterway on their way to the beach and never give their water route a second thought. What they are ignoring is a dredged navigation channel of 3,000 miles where travelers find historic and cultural sites, explorable rivers, sounds, creeks, and man-made canals.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 1999, p6-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4061
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William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist, John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773, on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. When he returned in 1777, he had categorized over 100 plants and 215 birds and had written an incomparable travel epic. The University of Georgia Press has recently reissued the narrative.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Winter 1999, p8-9, il
Record #:
4121
Author(s):
Abstract:
Plentiful game birds on Currituck Sound from the 1870s to the 1910s attracted many market hunters. These were hunters who were able to shoot without limit waterfowl which were then sold to markets and restaurants. Perhaps millions of birds were killed. Intervention by the federal government, with laws including the Weeks McLean Law (1913), brought unrestricted market hunting to an end in 1918.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1999, p6-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4229
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cape Fear River is a history-filled waterway, having seen early European explorers, including English, French, and Spanish ply its waters; bustling commerce, especially naval stores from 1720 to the Civil War; and warfare, including Spanish harassment during the 18th-century and the Union's blockade during the Civil War. Today it is a quiet stream, inviting travelers back through time.
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Record #:
4463
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In 2000, the North Carolina Wildlife Federation is fifty-five years old. Nickens discusses the growth of the organization, which was originally founded to lobby for a separate state wildlife agency, to a 22,500-member federation that has interest in and support of numerous environmental concerns. Twice the organization has been named National Wildlife Federation \"Affiliate of the Year.\"
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 48 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p2-9, il
Record #:
4929
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carolina northern flying squirrels are an endangered species with only nine known populations existing in the high peaks of North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. With the habitat of this elusive creature threatened by tree mortality, increasing tourism in the Appalachians, four-lane roads, and predators like bobcats, foxes, and coyotes, scientists seek to learn all they can about this Appalachian acrobat to save the species from further decline.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Winter 2001, p16, il
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Record #:
5411
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The Intracoastal Waterway connects sounds, bays, tidal rivers, and canals to provide boaters a passage from southern Virginia to Florida. Nickens describes a trip on the 140-mile Great Dismal Loop, which leaves Elizabeth City and goes to Norfolk through the Great Dismal Swamp, then returns through Currituck Sound.
Record #:
6551
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If everyone did everything right, what would be the best possible natural North Carolina that her citizens could hope for? In the recently published HORIZON 2100: AGGRESSIVE CONSERVATION FOR NORTH CAROLINA'S FUTURE, nine of the state's leading conservation scientists examined current environmental conditions and present a picture of the future. Nickens discusses their projections and lists the four primary strategies required to achieve it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 10, Mar 2004, p96-98,100, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6868
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Abstract:
William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773, on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. Part of his travels took him through eighty-one miles of western North Carolina. Today a hiking trail marks his journey's path. Nickens retraces the naturalist's steps and records his observations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p120-122, 124, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7113
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In the spring of 1867, after recovering from a serious eye injury, John Muir was trekking across western North Carolina. He was a young man of twenty-nine, and his great fame as a conservationist lay years ahead of him. He recorded his travel experiences across the postwar South in THOUSAND-MILE WALK TO THE GULF, published in 1916. Nickens retraces Muir's journey through what is now the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p136-139, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10158
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Among the winners of the North Carolina Governor's Conservation Achievement Awards are the North Carolina Sea Grant Program (Natural Resources Agency); Phytofinders of Kitty Hawk (Youth Conservationists); and J & B Aquafood (Business Conservationists).
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Record #:
11830
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Despite the best of intentions, people do get stranded deep in the woods with no chance of getting home for the night. Nickens lists several things to do that might save your life, including how to make it through the night without heat, first aid, and how to survive falling into cold water.
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Record #:
17321
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Abstract:
Once the American chestnut spread from the East Coast to the Mississippi River. The trees grew one hundred feet or more. They grew straight for the first fifty feet and produced great timber. The nuts were a cash crop that western North Carolinians sold at Christmastime. However, in 1904 scientists discovered the blight in New York City that by 1950 had destroyed about four billion chestnut trees. It is considered the largest ecological disaster of the 20th century.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p154-156, 158, 160, 162-163, il Periodical Website
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