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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Trails--North Carolina, Western
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Record #:
23770
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Art Loeb's love for hiking in Western North Carolina was the driving force behind the dedication of a 30 mile footpath bisected by the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Art Loeb Trail.
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Record #:
24080
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Southern Appalachian Wilderness Stewards is a non-profit organization made up of volunteers who build and maintain trails in National Forest wilderness areas. The organization fosters new generations of environmentalists and public land stewardship.
Record #:
24577
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This article gives readers advice concerning hiking the section of the Appalachian Trail that traverses North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 10, October 1971, p8-10, il
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Record #:
24688
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The Linville Falls Trail is a new and rugged path into a scenic and fishing paradise that is managed by the National Park Service. The author discusses his experience on the trail.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 24, April 1955, p13-14, il
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Record #:
26871
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The National Park Service has proposed changes in the official route for the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, which passes through North Carolina and thirteen other states. Changes in the route include relocations of rights-of-way. These changes were negotiated with affected landowners, trail clubs, and government representatives in the Park Service trail protection program.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 12, Dec 1981, p13
Record #:
3058
Author(s):
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The N.C. Bartram Society, named for naturalist William Bartram, has been building the Bartram Trail, a 70-mile hiking trail in western Carolina, for the last eighteen years. Completion is scheduled for the fall of 1997.
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Record #:
4588
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William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist, John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773 on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. The newly-opened, 81-mile Bartram Trail follows his path through the wilds of western North Carolina. Nickens describes his experiences hiking in Bartram's 200-year-old footsteps.
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Record #:
29727
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The Eastern Wood Bison, one of three subspecies of North American bison, was killed to extinction by 1825. Two trans-mountain migration routes of the eastern wood bison roughly followed the French Broad River near Asheville, North Carolina. Remnants of the old bison trails still exist today and are distinguished by deeply sunken paths with old, mature trees growing from high embankments.
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Record #:
29875
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Development continues on one of North Carolina’s newest greenway passes, the Fonta Flora State Trail. Plans for construction include more than seventy miles of trails linking the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail in Morganton to the Mountains-to-Sea Trail in Asheville, allowing hikers and cyclists to traverse North Carolina from east to west.
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Record #:
35726
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Human designed crafts of wood and glass could be found in the Parkway Crafts Center, which the author notes began as a home for textile tycoon Moses Cone. As for nature’s craftsmanship, Moose suggested that could be found in the Craftsman Trail nature walk and forest containing trees such as shagbark hickory. For visitors interested in camping, boating, fishing, horseback riding, and carriage riding, she included information about the nearby Price Campground.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p32-33
Record #:
35225
Author(s):
Abstract:
Touchstone Energy Cooperatives boasted that the Tarheel State’s cultural and natural landscape is as sundry as its inhabitants. When it comes to NC’s main mountain range, outdoor activities such as the Appalachian National Scenic Trail can offer new meaning to the great outdoors. For Piedmont Region travelers who are military buffs, Greensboro offers a Revolutionary War battle site in its Guildford Courthouse National Military Park. As for what the other end of NC’s climatic spectrum offers, visiting the Outer Banks lighthouses can provide a treasure trove of memories.
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Record #:
35822
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Vacation and recreation spots typically heavily populated—Atlantic Beach and the Appalachians. A place formerly popular was Hot Bed Springs. What made the originally named Warm Springs a hot bed for visitors was not entertainment venues, historic sites, or recreation areas. It was the reputed curative powers of its waters.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p49-50
Record #:
35854
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Abstract:
Trips along the Unwharrie Trail involved factors common to hiking: familiarity with the terrain, sufficient supplies of water, and trails well-constructed and maintained. Highlighting the uniqueness of the Uwharrie Trail experience were completion time, campsites number, and parking possibilities. For expert insights into the Uwharrie experience, the author offered Joe Moffitt’s An Afternoon Hike into the Past, “a must for campfire reading along the Trail.”
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p22-23
Record #:
36483
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Abstract:
For European explorers, natural historians, and botanists traversing the territory now known as North America, nature walks had at least two purposes. They were commissioned to find herbs to take back to the Old World and become familiar with the land their host countries intended to colonize. Naturalist William Bartram’s journey covered the Appalachian Mountains to Florida, as well as throughout the southeast to the Mississippi River. His chronicles, published collectively as Bartram’s Travels, may serve as an apt guide for those following the trail memorializing his journey. Within are a wealth of specimens, drawings, and observations about the people and landscape he encountered between 1773-1777.