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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Mahan, Hal
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Record #:
26919
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Owners of The Compleat Naturalist, Laura and Hal Mahan, discuss the seasonal cycles of animals, insects, and plants, specifically the monarch butterfly.
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Record #:
26927
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Mountain laurel season begins in May in Western North Carolina. These unique flowers were named for Pehr Kalm, a Swedish-Finnish botanist and explorer of North America in the eighteenth century. This article talks about the pollination process of the mountain laurel and other descriptive information about the plant.
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Record #:
29806
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For nearly twenty years, a massive effort has been underway to inventory all of the organisms that live in the Great Smoky Mountains. The All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory is the largest sustained natural history inventory in the United States, and has led to the discovery of thousands of new species.
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Record #:
29834
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The Southern Appalachians is home to more than sixty species of salamanders in North Carolina. The salamander fauna is so diverse because as the Appalachian Mountains formed and evolved, the salamanders adapted to profound geologic and climatological changes. Many species are in serious decline due to diseases and water pollution.
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Record #:
29849
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Botanists are attempting to refine the classification of twenty species of native azaleas, which all fall under the scientific genus name of Rhododendron. As their research continues, people can learn about azaleas at the North Carolina Arboretum. The arboretum is home to the National Native Azalea Repository of azaleas representing nearly every species native to the United States, along with many natural hybrids and selections.
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Record #:
36584
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N has joined essential vitamins like C in promoting holistic human health. The authors noted that health of body, mind, and spirit can happen by mindfulness, the act of focusing the senses on the present time and surroundings. Related to mindfulness is what they dubbed mindfulness of past experiences, or remembering sensory details affiliated with nature encounters.
Record #:
36553
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Perhaps fabulous about fungus is their present status in the realm of biology. Long considered as a plant, recent research has concluded them to be more closely related to animals. More information about the living thing classified in its own kingdom can be found in the author’s description of fungal anatomy, an activity called spore printing, and a local mushroom club.
Record #:
36483
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For European explorers, natural historians, and botanists traversing the territory now known as North America, nature walks had at least two purposes. They were commissioned to find herbs to take back to the Old World and become familiar with the land their host countries intended to colonize. Naturalist William Bartram’s journey covered the Appalachian Mountains to Florida, as well as throughout the southeast to the Mississippi River. His chronicles, published collectively as Bartram’s Travels, may serve as an apt guide for those following the trail memorializing his journey. Within are a wealth of specimens, drawings, and observations about the people and landscape he encountered between 1773-1777.
Record #:
39404
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Goldenrod is often blamed as the cause for those suffering with allergies and hay fever, though the actual culprit is ragweed. Unlike ragweed, goldenrod is insect pollenated, Goldenrod nearly became an industrial commodity during World War I.
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