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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Turkey hunting
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Record #:
14151
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Abstract:
The modern version of a turkey shoot sporting event is greatly different form than it was in the early days.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 26, Nov 1949, p3, f
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Record #:
26420
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North Carolina’s turkey harvest hit an all-time high in 1979, the largest taking of the bird since the turkey season was initiated.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 1, Jan 1980, p5
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Record #:
4577
Abstract:
Hunters who have stalked bear, boars and deer feel that hunting a wild turkey with a bow is one of the most challenging hunts. Gaddis discusses what a hunter must consider to have a successful turkey hunt: preparation, set-up, shooting strategy, the shot, and the right gear, including bows, decoys, camouflage, seats and calls.
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Record #:
4572
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North Carolina's wild turkey population has come-back from 2,000 in 1970 to 100,000 in the year 2000. In 1999, 5,340 gobblers were taken during the hunting season. In 13 counties, 28 newly restored turkey areas will open, and wildlife biologists predict another record harvest.
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Record #:
4993
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Good nesting conditions over several years and the opening of five new hunting areas create the possibility for another record wild turkey harvest in 2001. In 2000, hunters killed 6,827 wild turkeys, which was a new North Carolina state record. So well has the turkey population increased that in fifteen of the last seventeen years, a state hunting record has been set.
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Record #:
4994
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Not every wild turkey hunt can be made under ideal conditions. Sometimes a hunter encounters rain, sleet, thunder and lightning, fog, wind, or bitter cold. Almy discusses tactics to help the hunter make the best of bad weather conditions.
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Record #:
5723
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The wild turkey has made a remarkable recovery in North Carolina. From a low of 2,000 in 1970, wild turkeys now number 130,000 and are found in all one hundred of the state's counties. To better manage restoration, the state dropped the fall hunting season in 1972, and instituted a spring one. Powell discusses the possible return of the fall season.
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Record #:
11034
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Not everyone has an opportunity to begin hunting turkeys at an early period in their life. For those who take up the sport in later life, Ingram offers some hunting suggestions.
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Record #:
11035
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Modern-day turkey hunters have a choice of shotguns. Humphries discusses differences between the standard shotgun and the modern specialized turkey shotgun.
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Record #:
19265
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An advocacy group of disabled veterans new program puts wounded veterans in the field with North Carolina turkey hunting guides and has proven successful not only in the hunt but in providing a network of aid for disabled veterans.
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Record #:
28438
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For years, forty yards was the limit most hunters imposed on themselves for shooting at a wild turkey. Advancements in ammunition shells and chokes allow North Carolina turkey hunters to take aim from farther away than before.
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Record #:
31313
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The wild turkey population in North Carolina has more than tripled in the past twenty-five years, with the help of restoration efforts by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Wild turkeys are found throughout the state, with the largest populations in the Roanoke River basin, Camp Lejeune, and Caswell County areas. Despite their growing numbers, the North Carolina turkey hunting season remains from April 10 to May 8.
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Record #:
35638
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The recollected memory took place during the author’s childhood visit to her grandmother Mary Casey. As for what took place in a town the author also regarded as home, it involved visitors from Virginia and Maryland. They helped to make one Christmas Eve in the village memorable through their participation in town’s annual Turkey Shoot.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Dec 1977, p26-30
Record #:
36161
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Parts of the wild turkey not consumed were used in ingenious ways, Native American groups had proven for hundreds of years. The anatomical parts that could be decorative or utilitarian included the wild turkey’s bones, spurs, feathers, and beards.
Record #:
36165
Author(s):
Abstract:
The recovery of the wild turkey’s population helped to assure the ongoing need for turkey calls, an important tool in a hunter’s kit. Included was directions for making a scratch box turkey call and images of turkey calls that prove them decorative and utilitarian.