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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Monarch butterfly
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Record #:
7375
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Abstract:
Monarch butterflies begin their migration to Mexico from southern Canada and the eastern United States in late August. Many of the 100 million travelers will not complete the 3,000-mile journey, but their descendants will. Females lay eggs along the route, then die. The eggs hatch into the larval stage, then through all stages, till the new butterflies emerges. It may take several generations to reach Mexico and several to make it back to Canada, where the cycle begins again. In mid-September the monarchs pass through North Carolina. The best areas to view them are along the beaches and the gaps along the Blue Ridge Parkway and other mountain roads.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p158-160, 162, 164, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9753
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Each year millions of monarch butterflies pass through the state on an incredible roundtrip from Canada to Mexico and back. Ellis describes the monarch's life cycle and journey.
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Record #:
24015
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Nina Veteto has always loved nature and is now a teacher and environmental educator. She strives to inform others about the importance of monarch butterflies and suggests ways for locals to boost native populations of butterflies, ensuring their continued existence in the region for years to come.
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Record #:
26919
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Owners of The Compleat Naturalist, Laura and Hal Mahan, discuss the seasonal cycles of animals, insects, and plants, specifically the monarch butterfly.
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Record #:
5325
Author(s):
Abstract:
Monarch butterflies begin their migration to Mexico from southern Canada and the eastern United States in late August. Many of the 100 million travelers will cover 3,000 miles at speeds of 10 mph. In mid-September the monarchs pass through North Carolina. The best areas to view them are along the beaches and gaps along the Blue Ridge Parkway and other mountain roads.
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Record #:
34611
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The monarch butterfly in North America makes its way down to Mexico every year to lay eggs, passing through North Carolina in spring and fall. But with the decline of milkweed and other native plants, the monarch butterfly populations drop as well. North Carolinians can help by growing native species in their gardens.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2014, p2-3, il