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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Herbal Medicine
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Record #:
35132
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is a list of remedies that can be made at the home for ailments such as itchiness, wounds, coughing, and more serious illnesses like the measles.
Record #:
35351
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author reflects on the various poems, biblical writings, stories, and writings down my famous historical figures that allude to finding the cure for male flaccidity via herbal remedies.
Record #:
35810
Abstract:
The authors asserted them as a healthy and free supplement to the modern American diet: wild plants. To assure the collection is healthy were books such as Walter Muenscher’s Poisonous Plants of the United States and A Guide to Medicinal Plants of the United States. Helping to concoct a recipe for success were plants that could be eaten raw (dandelions and onions), ones that must be cooked (burdock roots and milkweed), and dishes such as dandelion salad.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p48-49
Record #:
37415
Author(s):
Abstract:
A description of the Tryon Palace kitchen soon gave way to kitchens of the Colonial period. In its focus on the importance of that room in Colonial homes, it noted kitchens as places likely for making medicine and food. Noted places for storage of recipes for food and herbal remedies were cookbooks and servants’ books.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p12-13
Record #:
36306
Author(s):
Abstract:
Supplementals offer an alternative treatment measure for conditions ranging from allergies to stress. Offering credibility to alternative medicines were descriptions of popular brands such as Adrenal Health and Tumeric Supreme, as well as a profile of a supplier, Gaia Herbs.
Record #:
36483
Author(s):
Abstract:
For European explorers, natural historians, and botanists traversing the territory now known as North America, nature walks had at least two purposes. They were commissioned to find herbs to take back to the Old World and become familiar with the land their host countries intended to colonize. Naturalist William Bartram’s journey covered the Appalachian Mountains to Florida, as well as throughout the southeast to the Mississippi River. His chronicles, published collectively as Bartram’s Travels, may serve as an apt guide for those following the trail memorializing his journey. Within are a wealth of specimens, drawings, and observations about the people and landscape he encountered between 1773-1777.