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39 results for North Carolina Museum of Art--Collections
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Record #:
8060
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Art is one of only two art museums in the country to have a permanent display of Jewish ceremonial art. The Judaic Art Gallery was founded by the late Dr. Abram Kanof. Among the items in the collection are ornaments that decorate the Torah and a rare late 18th-century silver Torah shield.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 2006, p6-7, il
Record #:
13722
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh is home to the most visible expression of Jewish cultural heritage in the South. Housed in the Judaic Art Gallery, the collection owes much to Dr. Abram Kanof, who championed its creation. The museum is one of only two general collections in the nation with a permanent Judaic collection.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 10, Mar 2011, p140-142, 144, 146-147, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25595
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Art is the only state gallery in the United States with a permanent collection of ceremonial Judaica displayed as art. The permanent Judaic Gallery is the result of a six-week exhibition, “Ceremonial Art in the Judaic Tradition” by guest curator Abram Kanof. He initiated a fundraising campaign and contributed a number of pieces from his personal collection.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 17, September 14-27 1984, p17, 18-19, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27549
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham native Caroline Vaughan is a photographer with a national reputation. She is recognized for capturing the small and ordinary moments and was named on the 43 undiscovered masters of photography in 1977. Her work is held in collections by major museums in North America. Vaughan works during the week as a researcher at the Duke Development Office and spends her free time pursuing photography. Vaughan discusses the importance of time and patience to her work and in her life.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 21, July 27- Aug. 2 1989, p7-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
29502
Abstract:
The Museum recently acquired six new works of art and is opening a new video gallery in the East Building. Giovanni Martinelli’s Memento Mori: Death Comes to the Table circa 1630-38, Yink Shonibare’s, MBE Wind Sculpture II 2013, Flemish, Antwerp School’s Saint Jerome in His Study circa 1560-70, Hieronymus Mittnacht’s Torah Shield 1747-49 are four of the works that were acquired. The artist of each work, an illustration of the work, and a description of the subject and style are detailed. A preview of the upcoming exhibits in the new video gallery is also included and will feature the work of James Nares.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Summer 2014, p14-19
Record #:
29512
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Art’s statue of Bacchus is a composite of two ancient fragments that were assembled along with other baroque additions. The discovery was initially made in 1958 and it was never displayed as a result. A derestoration is planned over the next couple of years. The torso is one of only four other Roman imperial-period torsos known to exist and is from 2nd century, the head of Bacchus is from the 1st-3rd century and belonged to a Roman statue of a Greek Dionysos, and the left arm, hand, and some supports are baroque additions and will be removed eventually.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2014, p24-25, il
Record #:
29517
Author(s):
Abstract:
The painting Lady Mary Villiers, Later Duchess of Richmond and Lennox, with Charles Hamilton, Lord Arran (circa 1637) was recently restored by the Museum’s Conservation Lab. Flemish artist Anthony van Dyck’s portrait is considered a masterpiece, but suffered from discolored varnish, areas of retouching, and pentimenti. The cleaning and restoration process are described along with the quality and history of the painting.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2013, p22-23, il
Record #:
29520
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum’s newest acquisition of contemporary art is Kehinde Wiley’s "Judith and Holofernes" (2012). Wiley is known for his monumental portraits of African Americans placed in historical poses and settings appropriated from Old Master paintings. Wiley is known for critiquing the racism of art history and this portrait references a 17th century painting by Giovanni Baglione, Judith and the Head of Holofernes (1608). Wiley’s painting can be interpreted as a comment on racial and gender identity and inequity, the representation of women throughout art history, and society’s ideals for beauty.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2013, p20-21
Record #:
29081
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Art opened a new African gallery featuring decorative and ceremonial artifacts, as well as contemporary artworks. Linda Dougherty, the museum’s chief and contemporary curator, discusses the meaning of the collection and the challenges of merging folk and fine art.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 24, July 2017, p23, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
29187
Author(s):
Abstract:
A pair of paintings by the Italian artist Ubaldo Gandolfi (1728-1781) was recently given to the museum with funds from the Robert F. Phifer Bequest. The paintings Mercury Lulling Argus to Sleep and Mercury About to Decapitate Argus were probably part of a set of four paintings which told a story and likely hung on the walls of a private residence. The subject matter, the quality, the artist, and the benefits of the gift are all described.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Spring 1983, p11-12
Record #:
29216
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Arts’ collection of European paintings is one of the finest and most important in the United States. The history of the collections’ acquisition and rationale for collection is detailed from the 1940s through the 1960s. Until the opening of the new museum, the collection was primarily viewed outside of North Carolina due to a lack of space at the old museum. Beginning September 10, the European paintings will be on view in a series of sequential galleries in the new museum after restoration work in the museum's new conservation laboratory.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1983, p4-7
Record #:
29281
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum has recently acquired American Landscape with Revolutionary Heroes, 1983, by Roger Brown, American, 1941- and Study for the “Race of the Riderless Horses,” circa 1820, by Emile-Jean-Horace Vernet, French, 1789-1863. Brown’s painting was purchased with funds from the Madeleine Johnson Heidrick bequest and depicts Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other revolutionary war heroes in shadow. Vernet’s painting was purchased with funds given by MR. and Mrs. Warner L. Atkins and is a study for another work, depicting a popular horse race held during the Roman carnival season in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1984, p
Record #:
29290
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum recently acquired works titled Cabbage Worship, 1982, by Gilbert and George, British and Agony in the Garden, by Giovanni “Guercino” Francesco Barbieri (1591-1666), Italian. Cabbage Worship addresses how individuals put their faith in fake causes by having individuals worship a head of cabbage. Agony in the Garden was painted between 1627 and 1632, probably for the altar of a chapel in the church of St. Margherita in Bologna, and depicts an angel appearing to Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane. A description and short biography of the artists is described.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 1984/1985, p11-12
Record #:
29306
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several sixteenth- and seventeenth- century works were received at the Museum as gifts from the late Mrs. George Khuner of Beverly Hills, California. The gift includes seventeen Dutch, Flemish, Italian, and German paintings. The masterpiece of the group is a work titled Virgin and Child in a Landscape by the German artist Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1553). Cranach was highly influential upon his contemporaries and his biography and the painting are briefly described.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Spring 1985, p13
Record #:
29354
Author(s):
Abstract:
A terracotta sculpture by French artist Joseph Charles Marin (1759-1834) was recently purchased by the Museum. The sculpture is titled Bacchante Carrying a Child on Her Shoulders and was sculpted during the late 18th century when such sculptures were popular. Marin was a student and collaborator of the artist Claude-Michel Clodion and likely created the figure between the 1780s and 1796.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1985, p14-15