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37 results for Photography
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Record #:
2691
Abstract:
Photography's popularity increased in the state between 1865 and 1900, with about 450 itinerant and resident photographers working. Included for the first time were women and Afro-American photographers.
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Record #:
2805
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With photography increasing in popularity between 1865 and 1900, around 450 itinerant and resident photographers found employment statewide. A listing of them is included.
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Record #:
3284
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William Bake of Boone was not born in the South, nor did he have formal training in photography. Nevertheless, he has been called the Andrew Wyeth of photography and the foremost photographer of southern landscapes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 57 Issue 6, Nov 1989, p22-25, il, por
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Record #:
3516
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Five of the state's most talented photographers - Hugh Morton, Susan Page, Mark Wagoner, Carolyn DeMerrit, and Roger Manley - are profiled.
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Record #:
3934
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Bayard Wootten, who was born in New Bern in 1875, is one of the state's most noted photographers. Her career spanned fifty years, and her photographs of the Great Depression are among her best-known works.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 1998, p18-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4173
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Bayard Wootten, born in New Bern in 1875, is one of the state's most famous photographers. A portrait photographer in her early days, she later traveled across the South, photographing the effect of the Great Depression, people of Appalachia and the Ozarks, landscapes, and architecture. Today Wootten's work is in the North Carolina Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill's Wilson Library. It is the largest photography collection there - taking up a twenty-foot row of bookshelves.
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Record #:
4565
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Men dominated photography in the 19th-century. It was felt the demands of the profession, such as developing, chemical knowledge, and cumbersome equipment, were too arduous for women who were mostly assistants. A few women persisted, including Malvina Ramsour in Lincoln County, Kate Johnson in Durham, and Mrs. H.H. Davisson in Oxford. It was at the beginning of the 20th-century that women began to step behind the camera. The premier woman photographer of this period in North Carolina was Bayard Wootten.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000, p88-92, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10780
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St. John's Art Gallery asked famed photographer Hugh Morton to exhibit some of his favorite works in his hometown of Wilmington. Morton, who also shot combat reels during World War II, chose his favorite photographs out of the many he has taken over the years, which include the launching of the battleship North Carolina in the Cape Fear River and an above-the-clouds view of Grandfather Mountain near Linville.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 9, Oct 1968, p10-13, il, por
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Record #:
23986
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The author presents things to do in downtown Asheville once the sun goes down, such as Pritchard Park. The author focuses mostly on the best areas to take photographs of late-night activities in downtown.
Record #:
25496
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UNC undergrad Zoe Litaker first visited Turkey in 2008 to photograph villagers of Esenler. When she returned to Turkey in 2011, many of the villagers had moved to urban areas for education and employment opportunities.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p24-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25536
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Mike Sonnichsen is a lecturer and manager of the print and photo labs in the art department. Sonnichsen creates photograms and prismatic prints of plastic objects using an aquatint etching technique. The technique uses an acid bath to produce an array of vivid, watery hues.
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Record #:
25547
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Susan Harbage Page is a UNC photojournalist who photographs things abandoned by immigrants along the Rio Grande on the United States-Mexico border. Page has photographed objects such as homemade flotation devices, detention center bracelets, wallets, undergarments, and other intensely personal items.
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Record #:
25670
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Jeff Whetstone has photographed the caves of Tennessee and Alabama, and grasshopper infestations in Utah, Wyoming, and Nebraska. His new collection is called the New Wilderness, and features photographs of hunters, farmers, deer stands, and fishing tournaments in North Carolina.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Winter 2010, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27549
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Durham native Caroline Vaughan is a photographer with a national reputation. She is recognized for capturing the small and ordinary moments and was named on the 43 undiscovered masters of photography in 1977. Her work is held in collections by major museums in North America. Vaughan works during the week as a researcher at the Duke Development Office and spends her free time pursuing photography. Vaughan discusses the importance of time and patience to her work and in her life.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 21, July 27- Aug. 2 1989, p7-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
28516
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Pictures from Carolina Country’s annual photography contest are presented. The photographs are images of people and places throughout North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Jan 2017, p10-16, il, por Periodical Website
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