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12 results for Morton, Hugh MacRae, 1921-2006
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Record #:
857
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Abstract:
Hugh Morton is a conservationist and a photographer of Grandfather Mountain.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 6, Nov 1992, p30-32, por
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Record #:
2934
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Hugh MacRae Morton is the recipient of the 1996 North Caroliniana Society Award. The award is given for outstanding contributions to the promotion and preservation of the state's culture, history, literature, and resources.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 3, Aug 1996, p3, por
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Record #:
4719
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Hugh Morton is a strong promoter of North Carolina. He headed the first Azalea Festival in Wilmington in 1948; fought to save the USS North Carolina and the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse; fought twelve years to keep the Blue Ridge Parkway from going over his mountain (It went around. The viaduct on Grandfather Mountain is an engineering marvel.); built the Mile-High Swinging Bridge on Grandfather Mountain; and for sixty years took photographs of the state and its people.
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Record #:
6775
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Hugh Morton is a strong promoter of North Carolina. He is world-famous not only as the developer and promoter of Grandfather Mountain but also as the champion of numerous causes that have affected the lives of nearly every citizen of this state. His current project is working to persuade Congress to do something about acid rain. In years past “he served on the Board of Conservation and Development during the Umstead, Hodges, and Kerr Scott administrations. Terry Sanford chose him to head up the USS North Carolina Battleship Commission. Jim Hunt named him Chairman of the Governor's Advisory Committee on Travel and Tourism.” Morton, a world-class photographer, is profiled in NORTH CAROLINA magazine's “executive profile.”
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 5, May 1990, p8, 12, il, por
Record #:
10780
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St. John's Art Gallery asked famed photographer Hugh Morton to exhibit some of his favorite works in his hometown of Wilmington. Morton, who also shot combat reels during World War II, chose his favorite photographs out of the many he has taken over the years, which include the launching of the battleship North Carolina in the Cape Fear River and an above-the-clouds view of Grandfather Mountain near Linville.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 9, Oct 1968, p10-13, il, por
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Record #:
10994
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The G.F. Company, owned by Hugh Morton, his sister Mrs. Agnes Mayer, and John H. Williams, is developing the lower slopes of Grandfather Mountain into a golf and country club. The master plan calls for a ski lodge, with slopes and more residential structures.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 28 Issue 8, Aug 1970, p22-23, 46-47, il
Record #:
10993
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hugh Morton is a strong promoter of North Carolina. He is world-famous not only as the developer and promoter of Grandfather Mountain but also as the champion of numerous causes that have affected the lives of nearly every citizen of this state.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 28 Issue 8, Aug 1970, p17-20, 43-44, il, por
Record #:
12743
Author(s):
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Measured by a variety of standards of accomplishment and service to the State, Hugh McRae Morton of Wilmington and Linville has been named the North Carolinian of 1961. Best known for his leadership in the successful campaign to bring the USS NORTH CAROLINA home, Morton originated the idea of establishing the vessel as a floating museum. As authorized by the Assembly, Governor Sanford named a Battleship Commission, with Morton as head chairman, raising over $500,000 for the saving of the battleship.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 16, Jan 1962, p9, 25, por
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Record #:
13055
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Hugh Morton, born in 1921, inherited some unique properties: Grandfather Mountain and Fort Fisher. Born into a long line of business and development adventurers, Hugh joined the army in 1943 as a Signal Corps photographer. Hugh came back from the war injured, following the death of his father, Julian, and inherited sizable family debt. But Hugh married and began personally pouring money into the development of Grandfather Mountain; he built a road to the top, opened trails and hung a mile-high swing bridge between the peaks. As the tourism to Grandfather Mountain grows, so does the public persona of Hugh Morton, supporting festivals and associations, and gaining recognition for his good deeds.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1955, p8-10, 14, f
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Record #:
17055
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Jack Morton discusses the legacy of his grandfather, Hugh Morton, a remarkable photographer who not only documented a timeline of North Carolina's unique history, but also photographed some of the most notable American figures.
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Record #:
34988
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Hugh Morton, the “state’s unofficial photographer” according to many, began photographing North Carolina landscapes and everyday life when he was a child. Throughout his lifetime, Morton took over 25,000 images, had a handful of them grace the front of “The State” magazine (precursor to "Our State"), and used his photography to bring awareness to causes such as protecting Grandfather Mountain and preserving the USS North Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 8, January 2017, p108-112, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
37608
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Captured through the vast views of Aycock Brown, Hugh Morton, and Bill Russ was nearly a century of North Carolina life and images of beautiful landscapes and historic landmarks. Eighteen of their photos, taken at places like Jockey’s Ridge, the Smoky Mountains National Park, and the Wrightsville Beach Bridge, are showcased in this collection.
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