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11 results for Transylvania County
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Record #:
413
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mostly known for its mountain peaks, waterfalls, and pristine settings, Transylvania County is now emerging as a county rich in cultural opportunities and one with a considerable industrial base.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 6, June 1992, p24-29, il
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Record #:
23842
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1982, the Gwynn Valley Camp in Brevard has served as a summer camp for children. Residential and day camps, as well as 4-H programs use the camp to teach children about the farm-to-table process by encouraging interaction with farm animals, planting seeds, and harvesting vegetables.
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Record #:
24437
Author(s):
Abstract:
Transylvania County is home to some of the state’s most beautiful waterfalls; this article presents some of the most popular ones for tourists.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 12, May 1993, p20-22, il
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Record #:
24551
Abstract:
This article presents an account from a Florida attorney, Granville Lipscombe Larimore, in 1899 who visited Transylvania County, North Carolina. His papers reveal his experiences in Hendersonville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 1, June 1973, p8-11, il
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Record #:
25925
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent road construction has caused major siltation of the Thompson River in Transylvania County, North Carolina, virtually destroying the river as a trout habitat. Despite Thompson Rivers’classification as a ‘native’ stream, considered one of the best streams in the state, siltation has caused irreparable damage to the environment.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Spring 1973, p5
Record #:
26750
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carrasan Power Company has proposed to dam the river above Drift Falls in Transylvania County, North Carolina and divert most of its flow through a pipeline. The proposal threatens a section of Horsepasture River, which is among the most scenic and accessible river in the state for fishing.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p15, por
Record #:
32314
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Brevard Music Center in Transylvania County calls itself “The Summer Cultural Center of the South.” The center is an international summer institute and festival enrolling thousands of students who participate in orchestra, ballet, dance, and opera. This article discusses development, financing, and plans for improvement at the music center.
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Record #:
36968
Author(s):
Abstract:
Profile was that year’s solar eclipse, a total solar eclipse in history touted as viewable in towns such as Franklin, Sylva, and Highlands. Included in the profile were other contributions that western North Carolina has made to the field of astronomy. In the early 1960s, NASA established a satellite tracking station in Transylvania County, now called the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute. That institute became a site of research for this eclipse.
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Record #:
36306
Author(s):
Abstract:
Supplementals offer an alternative treatment measure for conditions ranging from allergies to stress. Offering credibility to alternative medicines were descriptions of popular brands such as Adrenal Health and Tumeric Supreme, as well as a profile of a supplier, Gaia Herbs.
Record #:
36471
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fly fishing and typing have deep roots in the Western North Carolina, according to the author. Theories related to their origins include people such as the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and places such as southern Appalachia. Bell attributes fishing’s enduring appeal to the lure of its therapeutic effect. Modern efforts to lure more to fishing include the Western North Carolina Fly Fishing Trail in Jackson County. Rivers recommended by the author for fly fishing are Asheville’s French Broad River and Transylvania County’s Davidson River.
Record #:
38285
Author(s):
Abstract:
Subject of the biography, Mountain Doctor, Dr. Gaine Cannon found his calling consummated in the North Carolina mountains. The people he treated, mostly lacking prior experience with physicians, saw him as more than such in their affectionate appellation Doc Cannon. The community also displayed a great value for his compassionate care in fulfilling his dream of a community medical center. First named Albert Schweitzer Memorial Hospital, it was Balsam Grove Medical Clinic the last three years of its existence.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 8, Jan 2011, p36-38, 40-42 Periodical Website