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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Cherokees
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Record #:
20924
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born in 1924, Jerry Wolfe is a respected elder of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. He is a link to the past for the Cherokees of today as he recounts the traditional tribal legends and stories, memories of growing up in Cherokee and attending the Cherokee boarding school, and sharing his knowledge of the game of Cherokee stickball. Wolfe received a Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for his contribution to preserving traditions of the Cherokee. He is also a recipient of a North Carolina Folk Heritage Award.
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Record #:
35692
Author(s):
Abstract:
A dance, originating in Appalachia and blend of Western European and Cherokee influences, had made a comeback. Its present popularity could be seen in counties such as Henderson, whose own Blue Ridge Mountain Dancers performed at the New York World’s Fair in 1964.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p11-12
Record #:
36536
Abstract:
Duncan is the recipient of the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for her work in giving Cherokee people a voice in folklore and ongoing research. She developed folklore and folklife curriculums for teachers in Macon County and created an archive for research.
Record #:
36471
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fly fishing and typing have deep roots in the Western North Carolina, according to the author. Theories related to their origins include people such as the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and places such as southern Appalachia. Bell attributes fishing’s enduring appeal to the lure of its therapeutic effect. Modern efforts to lure more to fishing include the Western North Carolina Fly Fishing Trail in Jackson County. Rivers recommended by the author for fly fishing are Asheville’s French Broad River and Transylvania County’s Davidson River.
Record #:
37642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clay was the stuff potsherds were made of, evidence for the lifeways of North Carolina inhabitants over the centuries. Places the author celebrated and commemorated included Fort Neoheroka, Town Creek, Soco Creek, and Seagrove.
Source: