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5 results for Town Creek Indian Mound
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Record #:
4813
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Abstract:
The Pee Dee Indians vanished from the Sandhills in the 1400s and their culture lay buried beneath cornfields in Montgomery County until 1937, when the state recognized the value of the site and purchased it. Excavated for nearly fifty years by Joffre Coe, the Town Creek Indian Mound is the only North Carolina Historic Site devoted exclusively to Native American history. The site was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
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Record #:
16074
Abstract:
In the mid-16th century, a group of Native Americans called the Invaders moved up to the Pee Dee River basin to settle. This group displaced the already settled population of Siouan tribes and proceeded to construct villages with dome-shaped houses protected by stockades. The ceremonial center, near Mount Gilead, was also stockade and within its walls ceremonies, burials of nobles, ball games, and execution of enemies all took place.
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Record #:
31587
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This brief comparison of ceramics from the Hollywood mounds with ceramics from the Town Creek mound in North Carolina emphasizes similarities in the physical appearance of the pottery and in the presence of an urn-burial complex at both sites. Material from upper levels at the Hollywood mounds is described as showing striking resemblances to the material from Town Creek. The Lower levels at Hollywood possess "Southern Cult'' material not duplicated at Town Creek, where "Southern Cult" influence is minor.
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Record #:
35119
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Edmond Boudreaux chronicled an updated ceramic development of the Town Creek Region, needed in light of the area’s extensive excavation history. Parts of this chronology included a description of the South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition, the six steps of the ceramic analysis for the author’s research, the use of multiple seriation methods, earlier research by Oliver (1992) proposing the groups of pottery fell into three ceramic phases. The excavation’s sites, typology for the pottery, and Ford seriation graphs were featured in figures. Tables contained seriation data and Mississippi period radiocarbon dates. Pottery images were located in Appendix A.
Record #:
37642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clay was the stuff potsherds were made of, evidence for the lifeways of North Carolina inhabitants over the centuries. Places the author celebrated and commemorated included Fort Neoheroka, Town Creek, Soco Creek, and Seagrove.
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