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6 results for Native American Artifacts, North Carolina
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Record #:
22562
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Abstract:
Although few early written accounts of Indians in the Piedmont region of North Carolina exist, there are traces of the native populations that have been left behind. The Saponi, Tutelo, and especially the Catawba were strong tribes in the Piedmont region, as seen through relics and remains such as stone implements, pottery, arrows, and even graves.
Record #:
31588
Abstract:
Abstracts printed in this volume from the Annual NCAS meetings contain two articles with relevance specifically to North Carolina. Coe’s paper presents new evidence of the age of the oldest culture found in NC, while Harrington presents a paper outlining the work being done to find the Fort Raleigh site on Roanoke Island.
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Record #:
31587
Author(s):
Abstract:
This brief comparison of ceramics from the Hollywood mounds with ceramics from the Town Creek mound in North Carolina emphasizes similarities in the physical appearance of the pottery and in the presence of an urn-burial complex at both sites. Material from upper levels at the Hollywood mounds is described as showing striking resemblances to the material from Town Creek. The Lower levels at Hollywood possess "Southern Cult'' material not duplicated at Town Creek, where "Southern Cult" influence is minor.
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Record #:
31598
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Abstract:
Work to build a parking lot at Morrow Mountain State Park unearthed the remains of a Native American village, and the project was halted until representatives from UNC’s Laboratory of Anthropology could inspect the site. A total of thirteen burials and fifteen other pits were excavated.
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Record #:
34486
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article presents a general historic overview of Hog Island, 1585-1711. Laughton discusses the island’s 16th century inhabitants, the Neusiok, and associated archaeological sites and historic records. While several historic shell mounds have been destroyed, other archaeological evidence continues to offer insight into the past. The historic record, on the other hand, details very little about Neusiok lifeways or political structure.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 4, Fall 1992, p16-21, il, por, map
Record #:
36973
Abstract:
This Native American mound, in existence since 800AD, currently serves as the sole state historic site dedicated to the heritage of North Carolina’s first natives. With formal excavations starting in the late 1930s, the village also contains one of the longest studied archaeological sites in the United States.