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9 results for Catawba Indians--North Carolina
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Record #:
13320
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Abstract:
Qualla Town, located in Haywood County, is an area encompassing 72,000 acres of land inhabited by the Cherokee and Catawba Native Americans. Divided into seven clans, each of which is managed by a chief, the indigenous peoples of this area still function and practice beliefs despite the widespread Native American removal that devastated tribes and belief systems elsewhere in North America.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 14, Dec 1954, p15-16, 24, il
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Record #:
19997
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article presents data pertaining to the name identity of the Catawba tribe and neighboring groups which was collected from the few remaining speakers of the language during the last days of the tribe's cultural life.
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Record #:
24678
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Abstract:
In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his experience in Qualla Town, in Haywood County. The town is occupied by Cherokee and Catawba Indians.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 14, December 1954, p15-16, 24, il
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Record #:
22562
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although few early written accounts of Indians in the Piedmont region of North Carolina exist, there are traces of the native populations that have been left behind. The Saponi, Tutelo, and especially the Catawba were strong tribes in the Piedmont region, as seen through relics and remains such as stone implements, pottery, arrows, and even graves.
Record #:
35116
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mary Fitts’ article covered the relationships facilitated between the American Indians groups residing in the Central Piedmont region between the sixteenth and first half of the eighteenth century. Highlighted were similar challenges the groups encountered. An examination of one of the groups inhabiting this region, the Catawba, involved factors such as their name’s possible origins, differences in class, social differences, and reasons for their becoming a confederacy of nations. With regards to their pottery, included were four tables and ten figures related to the locations and types. Their locations in this regions were revealed in three maps (see figures 2, 4, and 5), as well as locations for the archaeological expeditions (see figures 3 and 5).
Record #:
35117
Abstract:
In 2002-2003, Brent Riggs, R.P. Stephen Davis, and Mark Plane, archaeologists from the University of North Carolina, discovered Catawba pottery from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in New Town, South Carolina. Highlighted aspects of their discovery included this pottery’s characteristics, assemblage, production and trade. Also noted was this research’s significance and implications for the Colonoware debate. Figures feature location sites, shards or vessels images, and burnishing stones that aided in Catawba pottery’s production.
Record #:
35696
Abstract:
The Black Drink and Great Man, or a variety of tea and the known commonly gingsen, were among the multitude of remedies the Cherokee and Catawba produced from wild herbs. Such remedies, shamans in Nations such as these used in centuries past to treat a variety of medical conditions. What is modern is the regard for these remedies’ effectiveness, in particular for their power to provide a holistic cure.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p60-62
Record #:
36384
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Belmont Cardinals Tar Heel Junior Historians, Belmont Junior High School, Belmont, NC prepared brief articles on Belmont Abbey College, Major William Chronicle, The Catawba Indians and The Flood of 1916.
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Record #:
39017
Author(s):
Abstract:
Peter Henley, of England, was named by King George II as Chief Justice of North Carolina in 1755. He was noted for his dealings with treaties with the Catawba Indian Nation. When Henley died in 1758, he left a huge estate of 1,500 acres in Anson, New Hanover, and Orange Counties and unique and costly objects of art. He was buried in St. Paul’s Episcopal Church cemetery in Edenton, NC.