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68 results for Cherokee Indians--North Carolina
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Record #:
2634
Abstract:
Driven off their lands in 1838, a group of Cherokees hid out in Graham County. Known today as the Snowbird Indians, many, like Maggie Axe Wachaha, have maintained their identify while surrounded by a changing world.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 4, Sept 1987, p12-14,34-35, il
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Record #:
2717
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To raise money, the Cherokees are opening a gambling casino in Jackson County in 1996. It is expected to generate a profit of over $70 million a year. While some see a brighter future, others predict loss of traditional ways and a possible rise in crime.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Mar 1996, p20-23,25-26,29-30, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3532
Author(s):
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In November, 1997, the Cherokee Indians will open a gambling casino in Cherokee, the county seat of Swain County. It will employ over 1,100 people with an annual payroll of $29 million. Revenues will fund tribal programs and help the region's economy.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 11, Nov 1997, p46-47, il
Record #:
4336
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In 1995, Jean Dugan was elected principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokees. She is the first woman to hold the position. Dugan restructured the tribal government and established stringent financial controls. Her predecessor was impeached on charges of misusing funds. In the fall 1999 election, she was upset in her bid for reelection.
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Record #:
4774
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The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, located in western Carolina, established a tribal historic preservation office in December 1999. They are the twenty-first federally recognized tribe to do so. James Bird of the Eastern Band was appointed tribal historic preservation officer.
Record #:
5571
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Eva Wolfe is one of only ten people who practice the rare art of weaving traditional Cherokee rivercane baskets. She is also known for her doubleweave baskets, one of the most difficult weaving styles. In 1989, she received an N.C. Folk heritage Award.
Record #:
5570
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Abstract:
Walter Calhoun was awarded a 1990 N.C. Folk Heritage Award for preserving and teaching the ancient ceremonial arts and customs of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians.
Record #:
7765
Author(s):
Abstract:
Snowbird Cherokees in western North Carolina chose a trail planted with trees and medicinal herbs to honor the memory of tribal leaders, like Junaluska, who have passed down age-old traditions. The Medicine Trail, which was completed in 2002, is located outside Robbinsville. The nearly seventy-five varieties of plants along the trail were selected for their role in the community's medicine traditions. Most of the plants along the trail are identified and their curative powers described. Plants include Joe Pye weed, sourwood, yellowroot, and goldenseal.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p90-92, 94, 96-97, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8255
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Abstract:
Jerry Wolfe, an elder in the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, has spent many years storytelling and promoting Cherokee culture. His stories are drawn from his own experiences, including World War II and the Job Corps program, and from Cherokee animal tales. He is well-known as an expert on Indian stickball and as a carver of special sticks used in the game. He received the North Carolina Arts Council Heritage Award in 2003.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p104-105, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8293
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Abstract:
James Mooney of the U.S. Bureau of American Ethnology visited the Qualla Reservation of the Cherokees in 1877, gathered plants which the Indians used for food and medicine and did research on Cherokee myths. Most of what Money collected was donated to him by the Cherokee's leading shaman, an Indian named “Swimmer.” Swimmer also served in the Civil War, as a second sergeant of the Cherokee Company A, Sixty-Ninth North Carolina Confederate Infantry, Thomas Legion. With encouragement from Mooney, Swimmer compiled his knowledge of Cherokee culture and traditions into a 240-page book known as the Swimmer Manuscript, containing prayers, songs, and prescriptions to cure diseases.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p32, por
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Record #:
8641
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born in 1805, William H. Thomas was a key figure in preserving lands for the Cherokee Indians of North Carolina. The main locus of the tribe was called the Qualla. Thomas worked for the state senate from 1848 until 1861, when he resigned to work for the Confederacy. In 1862, Colonel Thomas recruited over 2,800 men, 400 of them Cherokee, to be a part of his Thomas Legion, which he commanded throughout the war. Due to their skill in the woods, the Cherokees were especially good at tracking down Yankees, who were trying to hide. After the war ended, several Cherokee soldiers were captured by the Union and contracted smallpox. In the spring of 1866, after some of the captives returned home, the disease spread through the Cherokee community. Despite the efforts of a doctor Colonel Thomas brought in to treat the Indians, more than one hundred Indians died.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983, p19-02, 62, por
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Record #:
9477
Abstract:
Ramona Lossie is a sixth-generation Cherokee basket weaver, and her daughters are seventh-generation weavers. She learned the art of weaving from her mother and grandmother. Creating a basket can take as long as four months; this includes collecting the material and preparing it. Her baskets sell for up to $2,000, depending on the size and complexity, and increase in value through the years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p146-148, 150,, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10674
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Archaeological excavations are currently being carried out in a mountain cornfield located near the east fork of the Tuckasegee River in Jackson County. The cornfield is thought to be the site of a Cherokee Village that once may have contained over 300 houses and that was destroyed in a raid in 1780 by John Sevier. Pottery, stone tools and weapons are among the artifacts that have been recovered. Additionally, several home sites have been excavated, revealing circular fireplaces in excellent condition, with ashes still intact.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 4, July 1969, p14-15, il
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Record #:
10806
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Abstract:
Among North Carolina's 100 counties and 650 cities and towns, there is one \"dependent sovereignty\" with a Principal Chief. The sovereignty is the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, proprietors of a 56,000-acre Western North Carolina wooded realm. The Principal Chief is Walter Jackson, born a Cherokee in 1924 and promoted by his fellow tribesmen in 1967 to the highest distinction an Indian can attain. Siler discusses the state's most unusual form of government and how it functions.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 17, Feb 1969, p8-10, il, por
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Record #:
11290
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Sharpe recounts how Sequoyah created an alphabet over one hundred years ago and brought literacy to the Cherokees.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 10, Oct 1965, p11, 28, il
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