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6 results for Medicinal plants--North Carolina, Western
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Record #:
7765
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Abstract:
Snowbird Cherokees in western North Carolina chose a trail planted with trees and medicinal herbs to honor the memory of tribal leaders, like Junaluska, who have passed down age-old traditions. The Medicine Trail, which was completed in 2002, is located outside Robbinsville. The nearly seventy-five varieties of plants along the trail were selected for their role in the community's medicine traditions. Most of the plants along the trail are identified and their curative powers described. Plants include Joe Pye weed, sourwood, yellowroot, and goldenseal.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p90-92, 94, 96-97, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10852
Abstract:
Before the advent of the modern drugstore, wild herbs, roots, and barks were harvested and used for medicinal purposes in North Carolina. Poison mandrake, witch hazel, and the bark of the wild cherry were \"must have\" items. Many of the harvested plants and roots have been found by modern pharmaceutical manufacturers to contain compounds that have been scientifically proven to aid in the treatment of disease and illness. In western North Carolina, the crude botanicals industry has created a booming business for traditional plant harvesters, who seek out the various herbs and roots and sell them to pharmaceutical companies at local buying stations.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 12, Nov 1967, p11-12, il
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Record #:
15531
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Abstract:
Mahler discusses the herb business in North Carolina, a business that comparatively few people know exists. Some seventy years in the state's mountains herb gathering had reached rather extensive proportions; then it languished until recently, when an establishment was opened in Lenoir by a nationally known drug house in Virginia. Now the gathering of herbs, leaves, and bark in the mountains has become profitable again.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 42, Mar 1935, p8
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Record #:
22309
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Clark explores the work of the Chestnut School of Herbal Medicine, located in Leicester, which teaches the uses of plants as natural remedies for skin ailments and sore muscle relief. Juliet Blankespoor, an herbalist for over twenty years, is the school's director.
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Record #:
22352
Abstract:
Miles examines the \"pioneering, Western North Carolina-based natural medicine manufacturer S. B. Penick and Co.\" who dominated the business for years. He founded his company in Marion in 1914, and with the advent of World War I and the need for medicine, his business increased tenfold.
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Record #:
7161
Author(s):
Abstract:
Snowbird Cherokees in western North Carolina chose a trail planted with trees and medicinal herbs to honor the memory of tribal leaders, like Junaluska, who have passed down age-old traditions. The Medicine Trail is located outside Robbinsville. The nearly forty-five plants along the trail were selected for their role in the community's medicine traditions. Plants include Joe Pye weed, sourwood, yellowroot, and goldenseal.
Source:
Full Text: