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23 results for Miles, Suzannah Smith
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Record #:
22219
Abstract:
Born in 1858 in Rutherford County, James Vester Miller was the son of a slave, Louisa, and her white owner. After the Civil War, his mother took her three children and made her way to Asheville. There Miller's interest in building developed and he was soon considered one of the city's master masons. He formed a company, Miller & Sons Construction, which specialized in churches and commercial buildings during the late 1880s and early 20th century. Among his noted works are the Post Office & Federal Building, later torn down, St. Matthias Episcopal Church, St. James A.M.E. Church, and Hopkins Chapel. He was also instrumental in the establishment of Violet Hill Cemetery for African Americans in West Asheville.
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Record #:
22271
Abstract:
Dr. Lucius B. Morse purchased Chimney Rock, a 2,280-foot tall, 535 million-year-old monolith, in 1902. Although a stairway to the top had been in use for the previous seventeen years, it was wearing down. Lucas hired Guilford Nanney, a carpenter-builder, to build a new trail system. Before he was hired, Nanney had built houses. Several of his Queen Anne-style homes in Rutherford County are on the National Historic Register. Miles recounts his work at Chimney Rock.
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Record #:
22285
Abstract:
The idea for a road connecting Tellico Plains, Tennessee to Robbinsville, North Carolina originated in 1958; however, it would take another thirty-eight years and $100 million to complete the forty-two-mile Cherohala Skyway. It was completed October 2, 1996 and was the most expensive road project ever undertaken in the state. The road is a marvel of engineering and was constructed over an area once considered impassable.
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Record #:
22355
Abstract:
William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773, on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. Part of his travels took him through seventy-four miles of western North Carolina. He is considered the father of American botany. Today his route is maintained by the NC Bartram Trail Society.
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Record #:
22352
Abstract:
Miles examines the \"pioneering, Western North Carolina-based natural medicine manufacturer S. B. Penick and Co.\" who dominated the business for years. He founded his company in Marion in 1914, and with the advent of World War I and the need for medicine, his business increased tenfold.
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Record #:
22418
Abstract:
After Daniel Boone, North Carolina's most famous mountain man was Big Tom Wilson, who was a noted guide, tracker, bear hunter, and master story teller who lived in Yancey County. However, it was leading a search party to find Elisha Mitchell's body in 1857 that brought him nationwide fame. Mitchell's claim that Black Mountain was the highest in the Appalachians had been challenged and he fell to his death remeasuring the mountain. Black Mountain was later named Mt. Mitchell in his honor when his claim was proven.
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Record #:
22449
Abstract:
The cultivation of tobacco was not unique to Eastern North Carolina comes to mind. The cash crop was also grown in the state's western mountains where those who worked in tobacco faced numerous difficulties.
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Record #:
23642
Abstract:
Black Mountain College was the brain child of John A. Rice, Jr. and was considered one of the most forward-thinking higher learning liberal arts centers of its time. The college supported a thorough inclusion of the arts in its education program.
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Record #:
23665
Abstract:
The Fontana Dam in Swain and Graham Counties in North Carolina was built to supply energy for defense industries during World War II.
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Record #:
23661
Abstract:
Olive Dame Campbell was a teacher in the 20th century who worked to record and preserve the songs of Appalachian culture.
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Record #:
23725
Abstract:
Miles discusses the suffering and loss of North Carolina's regiments during the battle of Gettysburg.
Record #:
23742
Abstract:
Following the Revolutionary War, a group of far western North Carolina counties attempted to create their own State of Franklin. It had its own governor, legislature, and state capitol but failed to survive statehood.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 2 Issue 4, June 2008, p60-65, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
23760
Abstract:
Hernando de Soto's (1496-1542) North American explorations from 1539-1541 led to the establishment of the first European outposts in the American South, including some in western North Carolina. However, conflicts with native tribes doomed these early efforts.
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Record #:
23771
Abstract:
Robert Morgan was a pilot during World War II from Asheville. The author discusses his life and accomplishments.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 3 Issue 4, June 2009, p42-45, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
23799
Abstract:
Lesley Riddle, an African American musician from Burnsville, was an early influence in country music in Western North Carolina in the 1930s and 1940s.