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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Mountain life
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Record #:
8124
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Margaret Morley, a well-known biologist, writer, illustrator, and educator, visited North Carolina's mountains in the 1890s. She was quite taken with the region and eventually settled in Tryon. In 1913, she wrote THE CAROLINA MOUNTAINS, a work that recorded her impressions of mountaineer life at the beginning of the 20th-century. A century later, it is considered one of the best books about the North Carolina high country where a way of life has now vanished.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p140-142, 144, 146, 148, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8657
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Frances Bullard recalls her 1920s schools days in the North Carolina mountains. She began her education in a one-room-one-teacher school that was taught by a teacher from the Normal School in Asheville. As a student, Bullard received her first vaccination. Excitedly, she and her classmates traveled to Busbee School for diphtheria vaccinations. The student's excitement waned when they saw the first needle. Bullard also learned about brushing her teeth using a toothbrush and a new product called Colgate toothpaste. Students were also taught how to make mayonnaise and light-bread sandwiches. Bullard's school grew, and she eventually attended a high school that had a separate teacher for each subject. While eager to learn new things as a child, Bullard is now returning to the mountains and the old-time mountain ways.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 5, Oct 1983, p9-10, il
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Record #:
8846
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William Marcus Cathey was born on Conley Creek in 1871. A true frontiersman, Cathey killed his first bear at the age of twelve. Cathey took care of his mother until her death and never married. His mountain tales were recorded by Dr. Joseph Hall of Columbia University in 1938. Cathey died in 1944.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p23-24, 35, il
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Record #:
15368
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The Great Smoky Mountains National Park displaced folks who remained relatively untouched by society in the 1930s. Citizens most affected by the park were located between the Ocona Luftee and Nantahala rivers. In this frontier, many people lived in humble log cabins and practiced historic trades such as weaving with a loom.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 2, June 1935, p1, 21, il
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Record #:
22418
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After Daniel Boone, North Carolina's most famous mountain man was Big Tom Wilson, who was a noted guide, tracker, bear hunter, and master story teller who lived in Yancey County. However, it was leading a search party to find Elisha Mitchell's body in 1857 that brought him nationwide fame. Mitchell's claim that Black Mountain was the highest in the Appalachians had been challenged and he fell to his death remeasuring the mountain. Black Mountain was later named Mt. Mitchell in his honor when his claim was proven.
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Record #:
24909
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Retired Charlotte news anchor Robert Inman worked for WBTV for 26 years. Throughout that time, he loved the mountains in Boone, NC and would travel there almost every weekend. Inman and his wife continue to love the mountains from the wildlife to the way it’s secluded.
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Record #:
25757
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Graham County’s unemployment have more than tripled since 1975, giving the county the highest rate in North Carolina for the last year and a half. Now, at the height of tourist season, unemployment still hovers around 17 percent; in the winter months it has been topping 30 percent which is 10 times the Triangle’s unemployment rate. An increasing number of families are living below the poverty line. THE INDEPENDENT profiles the Buchanan clan that has lived in Graham County for more than a hundred years.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 5 Issue 15, August 13-26 1987, p1, 7-9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
3560
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The state's most famous mountain man was Big Tom Wilson, who was a noted guide, tracker, bear hunter, and master story teller. However, it was leading a search party to find Elisha Mitchell's body in 1857 that brought him nationwide fame.
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Record #:
31102
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Rob Amberg was a writer and photographer who documented Appalachian culture in Madison County, North Carolina. “Sodum Laurel Album” is a flowing record of candid recollections by Amberg, musician Dellie Norton and her family interwoven with intimate photographs shot over two decades. Stories and pictures mark harvest seasons for vegetables, porch gatherings of family and friends, fiddle and banjo ballads, and other traditions in the remote mountain community.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 1, Jan 2003, p20, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31419
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Marilyn McMinn-McCredie of Asheville is a concert performer, historian and folklorist, and a cultural ambassador for North Carolina mountaineers. Living in the past and present at the same time, Marilyn tours the state telling mountain folk stories and sharing her family’s oral traditions. She also teachers folklore courses and gives lectures on public story-telling.
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Record #:
31486
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This article describes Patsy Moore Ginns’ new book, Snowbird Gravy and Dishpan Pie: Mountain People Recall, and presents personal narratives about mountain living in North Carolina.
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