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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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47 results for Personal narratives
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Record #:
20234
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Bonner presents the last of Sarah Francis Hicks' letters to her northern family. Hicks was the wife of Benjamin Franklin Williams, a North Carolina plantation owner.
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Record #:
28013
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A group of women share their family stories and personal experiences growing up in New Bern in the 1920s and 1930s. The women talk about childhood and life changes from hurricanes, the depression, and illnesses. Their stories reveal how we have gone from an agricultural economy to an economy dependent upon the military and tourism.
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Record #:
28015
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Furnifold McLendel Simmons lived in New Bern and served as U.S. Senator for North Carolina in 1901-1930. The Liberty Ship Furnifold M. Simmons was named after him. Callie Hollowell had served on the ship and provided an account of this episode.
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Record #:
28016
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Found with the papers of the late Dr. Joseph R. Latham, long a leading New Bern physician and surgeon, is what seems to be the only comprehensive and accurate account of the yellow fever epidemic in New Bern during the War Between the States. The written documents offer details of the epidemic which killed more of federal men than battle.
Record #:
28029
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The historic Attmore-Oliver House in New Bern was inherited by Hannah Taylor Attmore and her large family in 1859. During the Post-Civil War period, Hannah gave away her daughter, nicknamed Sunshine, in exchange for the nursing of her only surviving son. Sunshine’s granddaughter provided personal accounts and essential documents to complete this story.
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Record #:
28030
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George Attmore Sparrow, oldest son of Thomas Sparrow III and Ann Maria Blackwell, was born in Beaufort, North Carolina in 1845 and became a minister in the late 1880s. George’s family has a long history of prominence in eastern North Carolina. Personal letters George wrote to his father are presented in this journal issue.
Record #:
27997
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On March 29, 1862, the Reverend William R. G. Mellen, Chaplain of the 24th Massachusetts Regiment stationed in New Bern, wrote a personal letter to a minister friend. Mellen’s letter reflects his dedication to his ministry in time of war, and personal insight into life in New Bern.
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Record #:
28616
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Letters between Alfred Gurganious and his wife Susan Jane (DeBose) Gurganious offer a personal account of the day to day anxieties and frustrations that separation brought during the Civil War. In 1861, Alfred enlisted in the North Carolina State Troops, leaving Susan with six children and a farm to manage in New Hanover.
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Record #:
28637
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Reverend Thomas Wright lived in Wilmington, North Carolina working in the mercantile business. During a business trip to New York, his ship wrecked, he lost all his possessions, and he almost died. Letters to his cousin, John Scott, describe his life before becoming ordained in the Episcopal Church in 1820.
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Record #:
28636
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Reverend Thomas Wright lived in Wilmington, North Carolina working in the mercantile business before becoming ordained in the Episcopal Church in 1820. During a business trip to New York, his ship wrecked, he lost all his possessions, and he almost died. Letters to his cousin, John Scott, describe his life following the event.
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Record #:
28635
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Excerpts are presented from a journal kept by Mortimer DeMott in April and May, 1837. DeMott was in ill health and on a trip to the West Indies when the ship docked in Wilmington, North Carolina for several weeks.
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Record #:
28655
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Letters from the Lazarus-Calder records reveal the character of some of the first occupants of the Lazarus House, and provide a glimpse of Wilmington life in the nineteenth century. Aaron Marks Lazarus was a wealthy merchant who left no will when he died in 1841. This stimulated lively correspondence and Phila Cohen Lazarus Calder proved a faithful correspondent.
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Record #:
28670
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W. Walter Lane graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1852, received his doctorate in medicine from New York University, and then went to Paris, France for postgraduate medical study. Letters he received from family and friends during this time provide a glimpse into Wilmington’s antebellum town and plantation life.
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Record #:
28684
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The Howard Loughlin Collection consists of photographs, postcards, letters, and documents describing life in the Lower Cape Fear, North Carolina during the early 1900s. The collection tells stories about Wilmington residents and the steamships Wilmington and City of Southport.
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Record #:
28687
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This issue presents a letter written by Eliza Yonge Wootten to her husband Reverend Edward Wootten on November 8, 1898. The letter provides considerable insight into the mindset of some citizens during the 1898 political and cultural climate of Wilmington, North Carolina.
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