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10 results for Wilmington--History--19th Century
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Record #:
3671
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Members of the Latimer and Savage families of Connecticut relocated to North Carolina and were prominent families in Wilmington in the years before and during the Civil War.
Source:
Lower Cape Fear Historical Society Bulletin (NoCar F 262 C2 L6x), Vol. 42 Issue 1, Mar 1998, p1-8, il, por, bibl, f
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Record #:
3999
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Built in 1862, Fort Anderson was the last fortification against Union troops moving up the Cape Fear River to attack Wilmington. It fell to Union soldiers on February 17, 1865, leading to the capture of Wilmington and effectively shutting off the Confederacy's last supply line.
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Record #:
24511
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During the last months of 1864, Wilmington, North Carolina was the last porthole of the Confederacy to the outside world. This article describes how, though the town was blockaded by the Federal Blockading Squad, Brigadier General Edwin Grey Lee, C.S.A. managed to escape to Canada
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 11, April 1978, p26-28, por
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Record #:
28622
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Throughout the colonial era, Wilmington town commissioners grappled with the constant threat of fire. Despite the absence of serious fires, a number of precautionary measures were taken to protect the town. Before the Revolution, Wilmington had the most advanced means of fire control of any town in North Carolina.
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Record #:
28637
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Reverend Thomas Wright lived in Wilmington, North Carolina working in the mercantile business. During a business trip to New York, his ship wrecked, he lost all his possessions, and he almost died. Letters to his cousin, John Scott, describe his life before becoming ordained in the Episcopal Church in 1820.
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Record #:
28636
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Abstract:
Reverend Thomas Wright lived in Wilmington, North Carolina working in the mercantile business before becoming ordained in the Episcopal Church in 1820. During a business trip to New York, his ship wrecked, he lost all his possessions, and he almost died. Letters to his cousin, John Scott, describe his life following the event.
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Record #:
28657
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1865 began a period of political reconstruction in North Carolina, as well as improvements to Wilmington, the largest port in the state. The United States Army Corps of Engineers performed all major improvements on the Cape Fear River to enhance Wilmington’s commercial and economic position.
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Record #:
28658
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In the 1850s, several Jewish merchants established in Wilmington. While there were not enough Jews to form a congregation, by the middle of the 1850s enough had arrived to form a charitable society and to establish a burial ground for members of the faith.
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Record #:
28655
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Letters from the Lazarus-Calder records reveal the character of some of the first occupants of the Lazarus House, and provide a glimpse of Wilmington life in the nineteenth century. Aaron Marks Lazarus was a wealthy merchant who left no will when he died in 1841. This stimulated lively correspondence and Phila Cohen Lazarus Calder proved a faithful correspondent.
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Record #:
28663
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Alexander Calizance Miller’s origin was an intriguing mystery to his contemporaries at the beginning of the nineteenth century as it has been to his descendants ever since. In 1797 he left France with the help of Captain Miller, whose name he bore. He became friends with prominent leaders of Wilmington, North Carolina, and married Mary Brown, a general’s daughter.
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