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12 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Blockade runners
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Record #:
11302
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Abstract:
In 1862, Union ships attacked the MODERN GREECE, a blockade runner, and forced it to ground one thousand yards off Kure Beach. The crew fought their way to safety through the surf. Cannon fire from Fort Fisher kept the Union Navy from salvaging the ship; later, fire from Fort Fisher destroyed the MODERN GREECE to keep it from falling into enemy hands. A winter storm in 1964 revealed the old hulk lying in twenty-five feet of water. Salvage operation brought results as divers brought up rifles, bullets, sabers, shells, and even a cannon.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 15, Jan 1966, p10-11, 83-84, il
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Record #:
13355
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Confederate blockade runners often tried to break the Union blockade around Wilmington. One of the more prominent blockade runner ships was the C.S.S. Robert E. Lee. The first in a two-part series by The State, illustrations of the Union capture of the C.S.S. Armstrong, as well as armaments onboard chase boats, are featured.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 22, Mar 1955, p11-12, il
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Record #:
13363
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Blockade running during the Civil War was a common sight off of the coast of North Carolina. The second in a two-part series by THE STATE, the first half may be found in the March 1955 issue, Volume 22, Number 22, pages 11-12.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p11-12, il
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Record #:
14917
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Blockade running off the state's coast ran primarily out of Wilmington. Speedy steam engines attempted to pass Union blockading vessels from 1861 to the bitter end of the Civil War in 1865. In 1943, shipwrecks remains found were victims of the elements or enemy ships. A list is presented for wrecks off Hanover County and points south: Phantom, Nutfield, Wild Darrell, Fanny and Jenny, Doe, Venus, Lynx, Hebe, Beauregard, Night Hawk, Modern Greece, Condor, Petrel, Duoro, Raleigh, Arabian, Antonica, Spunky, Georgianna Mccaw, Bendigo, Elizabeth, Ranger, Dare, Vesta, etc.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 25, Nov 1943, p9, 14, il
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Record #:
21642
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Northrop recounts activities of blockade runners operating out of Wilmington, names of ships, and some of the famous captains of blockade runners and raiders, like John Wilkinson and John Newland.
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Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Spr 2012, p13-17, il, por
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Record #:
24511
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During the last months of 1864, Wilmington, North Carolina was the last porthole of the Confederacy to the outside world. This article describes how, though the town was blockaded by the Federal Blockading Squad, Brigadier General Edwin Grey Lee, C.S.A. managed to escape to Canada
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 11, April 1978, p26-28, por
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Record #:
24632
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During the Civil War, North Carolina was the only state to go directly into the business of blockade running to import war materials through the Union blockade and into Wilmington.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 16, January 1959, p7, 14, il
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Record #:
24682
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Abstract:
Part one of a two-part narrative, Wilkinson was in command of the ROBERT E. LEE (ship) and discusses what it was like to bring his ship through the Union blockading fleet in Wilmington during the Civil War.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 22, March 1955, p11-12, il
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Record #:
24692
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Part two of a two-part narrative, Wilkinson was in command of the ROBERT E. LEE (ship) and discusses what it was like to bring his ship through the Union blockading fleet in Wilmington during the Civil War.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p11-12, il
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Record #:
14871
Abstract:
One tactic used by the North to end the Civil War quicker was cutting off supplies to the South from Northern and European ports. Reducing needed food, clothing and weapons to fight would curtail the South's ability to carry on the war. To accomplish this, the North sent the Navy to blockade major Southern ports and smaller ports of entry. The South countered by building fast blockade runners to escape the Union Navy.
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Record #:
29530
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From pirate ships to Civil War blockade runners, nearly 1000 of the 5000 shipwrecks off the North Carolina coast have been documented by state archaeologists. In order to preserve and honor this underwater maritime history, the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources and their Underwater Archaeology Branch, dedicated the first Heritage Dive Site in North Carolina: the CONDOR.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2017, p34-35, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
28548
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Abstract:
The reemergence of the 1864 Agnes E. Fry shipwreck and its importance are detailed. The Agnes E. Fry was a blockade runner intended to be used to evade Union warships during the Civil War. The Fry’s history, the account of its final run as told by Bernard Roux Harding, and its place off the NC coast are described. Billy Ray Morris, director of the Underwater Archaeology Branch, rediscovered the ship and he describes the work being done to preserve and document the find.
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