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40 results for Wilmington--History
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Record #:
1099
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Bridgett Day Beatty was an interesting and prominent woman in 18th- and 19th-century Wilmington.
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Record #:
1503
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Steelman recounts the story of the 1898 Wilmington race riot, including a sketch of the history of prior race relations in the city and a discussion of the story's tangled historiography.
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Record #:
2380
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In January, 1816, Wilmington merchant John Fanning Burgwyn wrote to an unidentified person a detailed prospectus describing the port, river navigation, and exports and imports. The document is in the New Hanover County Public Library in Wilmington.
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Record #:
5384
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A collection of letters belonging to the family of Mary Eloise Bethell that were written during World War II gives a picture of life on the homefront in Wilmington. The letters are from officers at nearby Camp Davis who rented rooms at the Bethell home when they came to town.
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Record #:
5407
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The impact of World War II on Wilmington between 1941 and 1945 is discussed by Smith. Military construction was in high gear and included the following projects: a coastal artillery base; Camp Davis, which housed 20,000 soldiers; Army Air Force fields in New Hanover County; and naval and coast guard centers in Brunswick County. Housing was a great need, as were eating and entertainment places. However, the great prosperity also bought a rise in crime and related social problems.
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Record #:
5406
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Life on the homefront in Wilmington during World War II is portrayed as seen through the eyes of Dorothy Ulrich Troubetzkoy. Mrs. Troubetzkoy was the wife of Serge Troubetzkoy, an army officer, stationed at nearby Camp Davis.
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Record #:
5413
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This reprint of Jane Dalziel Wood's report on a local relief project in Wilmington describes the 1931 Block Messenger System which was created for War Relief work. The plan was \"to have a representative in each city block who was known as a messenger, to collect small change each week from voluntary contributors.\" The money was used to employ unemployed men in building a road.
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Record #:
5973
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Wilmington's past is remembered in a thirty-five block historical district. McDonald discusses how this area was saved for restoration and takes the reader on a tour of some of the restored homes and business buildings.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p33-36, il
Record #:
10691
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Hall recounts the reaction of Wilmington citizens and other individuals across North Carolina to the appearance of the Leonid meteor shower on a winter night in November 1833.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 8, Sept 1969, p14
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Record #:
14775
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Wilmington's Old Castle, an ancient structure, together with lengthy tunnels reaching to the water's edge, played a prominent part in the early history of the City by the Sea.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 31, Dec 1944, p1, 16
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Record #:
14907
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Immigrants settled Wilmington in 1730 and called it New Liverpool or Newton. In 1739 the city was incorporated and officially named Wilmington. Situated on a fresh-water harbor and near the Cape Fear River, Wilmington's maritime industry was always at the forefront. Shipbuilding and maritime trade accounted for the city's historic prosperity. Historically, ships from Wilmington engaged in naval encounters and privateering during the Revolutionary War, War of 1812 and Civil War.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 20, Oct 1943, p4, 25, il
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Record #:
14917
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Blockade running off the state's coast ran primarily out of Wilmington. Speedy steam engines attempted to pass Union blockading vessels from 1861 to the bitter end of the Civil War in 1865. In 1943, shipwrecks remains found were victims of the elements or enemy ships. A list is presented for wrecks off Hanover County and points south: Phantom, Nutfield, Wild Darrell, Fanny and Jenny, Doe, Venus, Lynx, Hebe, Beauregard, Night Hawk, Modern Greece, Condor, Petrel, Duoro, Raleigh, Arabian, Antonica, Spunky, Georgianna Mccaw, Bendigo, Elizabeth, Ranger, Dare, Vesta, etc.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 25, Nov 1943, p9, 14, il
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Record #:
14919
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The Cornwallis House built around 1770 in Wilmington functioned as a meeting house for military men in three different historic conflicts. During the Revolutionary War, Lord Cornwallis and his British officers established headquarters there after Wilmington's capture. Federal officers frequented the place for entertainment during the Civil War, especially after Wilmington's capture in 1865. Lastly, World War II brought American Army servicemen from Camp Davis, Fort Fisher, and Camp LeJeune as an officers' meeting place.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 28, Dec 1943, p6-7, il
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Record #:
14920
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Mayflower functioned as a very active vessel in American history. The ship served as Presidential yacht, engaged in the Spanish-American War, and saw service once again in World War II. Mayflower was a familiar sight in Wilmington because it had been moved for repairs in 1933. It wouldn't be refitted until World War II when the Coast Guard renamed it Butte and outfitted it as a man-of-war.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 29, Dec 1943, p8, 26, il
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Record #:
17783
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Wilmington thrived as a Civil War blockade running port because of its proximity to foreign ports, Bermuda and Nassau, and internal connections via railroad to Charleston and Richmond. Typically blockade runners brought in much needed supplies and were celebrated, however, the steamship Kate also brought along yellow fever in the late summer of 1862. Historic sources vary on total number of deaths but modern scholars believe it to be between 446 to 700 or more.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 13, October 2005, p16-28, il
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