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219 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
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Record #:
147
Author(s):
Abstract:
Contrary to the assertions of most history books, Gen. James Johnston Pettigrew of North Carolina was the hero of \"Pickett's Charge\" at The Battle of Gettysburg.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 8, Jan 1992, p14-15, por
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Record #:
183
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Miles Garrett was a Confederate soldier who held Unionist beliefs.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 11, Apr 1992, p14-15, por
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Record #:
758
Abstract:
Captain Baylis Edney of Western North Carolina was the organizer of the 25th Regiment of North Carolina troops during the Civil War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 3, Aug 1992, p12-14, il
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Record #:
784
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Abstract:
A Confederate unit's six-month stay at Woodfield Inn in the southwestern Blue Ridge Mountains is still remembered and celebrated each September in Flat Rock.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 4, Sept 1992, p33-35, il
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Record #:
811
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Abstract:
When General Sherman crossed the North Carolina line in March 1865, his troops showed no mercy to small Anson County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 5, Oct 1992, p32-34, il
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Record #:
1386
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Abstract:
Hundreds of young North Carolina boys joined the Confederate Army. Two who later rose to prominence were Walter Clark, a North Carolina Supreme Court Justice, and William Cain, the longtime head of the math department at UNC-Chapel Hill.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 9, Feb 1994, p13-14, por
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Record #:
1853
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Abstract:
A system of trails connecting several of North Carolina's Civil War historic sites has been proposed as an educational method of preserving the state's role during the war.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 4, Sept 1994, p3, il
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Record #:
2065
Author(s):
Abstract:
For individuals interested in Civil War history, there are a number of important sites and battlefields in North Carolina, such as Bentonville, which was one of the war's largest battles.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 12, May 1994, p24-28, il
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Record #:
2084
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Abstract:
Jonathan Worth, North Carolina's first post-Civil War governor, endured strong opposition from the state's unionists to his efforts to provide artificial limbs to those Confederate soldiers who lost limbs in battle. His tireless efforts were successful.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 8, Jan 1995, p36-37, por
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Record #:
2272
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legends and rumors about Confederate Treasury gold being buried in N.C.'s Piedmont continue to the present day. That any vast horde of gold was ever hidden in the state, however, is unlikely.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 12, May 1995, p17-20, por
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Record #:
2587
Author(s):
Abstract:
By the end of the Civil War, over 331,000 slaves had been freed statewide. Although they were free, life for former slaves was not easy. Opportunities were limited, and in the years following emancipation, progress was slow.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 35 Issue 1, Fall 1995, p12-17, il, por
Record #:
2594
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Bentonville Battlefield State Historic Site in Johnston County has acquired 3.5 acres of the battlefield. The acreage contains trenches forming part of the main Union line during the battle.
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