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14 results for Social life and customs
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Record #:
21875
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Abstract:
Build a house in the South; put a large porch on it, and a swing just has to go with it. McElvain share remembrances of this very Southern custom.
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Record #:
26967
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Melinda Ruley visited elementary, junior high, and high schools in North Raleigh to review school lunch periods. She observed how lunch is a critical time of day when children and teenagers are judged by their peers and worry about being cool. Ruley notes that this situation continues into adulthood.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Feb 25-Mar 9 1988, p24-27, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27698
Abstract:
Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study on the Page family and their eighteenth-century mansion in Gloucester County, Virginia known as Rosewell. The house construction and architecture proclaimed its occupants to be powerful, educated and wealthy, but in less than three generations, the Page family suffered drastic economic decline.
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Record #:
27712
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A study by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina revealed that tombstones became important religious and social symbols in York County, South Carolina in the late eighteenth century. The construction of tombstones manifested unique carving art and development in the region. But because tombstones were expensive to erect, they were a statement of economic and social superiority.
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Record #:
27708
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The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study of 17th, 18th, and early 19th century Charleston estate inventories. Analysis revealed that Neoclassical dining rooms were not designed solely for the purpose of eating. The upper-class used dining rooms to display the wealth of glassware and silver to impress friends and business acquaintances of the owner.
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Record #:
27713
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The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina has located a number of rare schoolgirl embroideries from Virginia. The needlework provides insight into the lives of young girls, religious and moral values, and women’s social standing.
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Record #:
28013
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A group of women share their family stories and personal experiences growing up in New Bern in the 1920s and 1930s. The women talk about childhood and life changes from hurricanes, the depression, and illnesses. Their stories reveal how we have gone from an agricultural economy to an economy dependent upon the military and tourism.
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Record #:
27992
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Taverns, which are also called inns or ordinaries, have historically been thought of as places where people met and drank. The role of taverns was much larger, actually, serving as places of refuge for travelers to New Bern. Taverns have also been centers for business, entertainment, and communication.
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Record #:
28165
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The brick smokehouse built in 1847 behind the Attmore-Oliver House in New Bern has contributed to the interpretation of the house and social life history. People had a smokehouse because it was used to prepare ham, a resource which represented the peak of gentrified high status. Brick was used to reduce the incident of fire and also reduce stealing.
Record #:
30558
Author(s):
Abstract:
Changes in public historical agencies often happen so rapidly and drastically that administrators are not capable of performing an extensive assessment of long term program goals. The goals of a public historical agency should include the re-intermeshing of various specializations, with active efforts to preserve both social and material history.
Record #:
31160
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the 1950s and 1960s in rural North Carolina, going to church was a weekly special event for all members of the family. During this time, there was no air conditioning and Sundays in August were different than today. Perry Comer, a pastor in Wadesboro, describes in detail what church was like without air conditioning and how people stayed cool.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 8, Aug 2003, p14-15, il
Record #:
35189
Abstract:
This is a letter written by the author in 1812, describing the events of a social holiday he partook in with several friends: hiking to Table Rock and partying on the way there and back.
Record #:
35903
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Hosted by Ray Greene, a weekly event of old-time music features fiddling, bluegrass, swing, Christian music, and more.
Record #:
40907
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recollection of his grandmother prompted the author to include what life was like a century ago, which lacked conveniences many today believe essential for happiness. Included with his recollection were sayings popular back then and dietary habits that didn’t stop Effie May Daughtridge from living into her nineties.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2016, p29-30, 50