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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Farm life
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Record #:
2432
Author(s):
Abstract:
Historical farms, like Cedarock Historical Farm in Alamance County and Duke Homestead in Durham County, give visitors the feel of a working farm in the 19th- and 20th-centuries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 2, July 1995, p18-20, il
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Record #:
8519
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Abstract:
North Carolina's Highway Historical Marker Program, which celebrated its seventieth anniversary in 2006, is one of the oldest and most respected of its kind in the country. There are markers in all one hundred counties, over 1,440 currently. Gery describes twenty-eight markers that highlight the important role rural people and places have had in the state's history.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p11-13, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24047
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Abstract:
Tony Peacock is a six-time champion of the National Hollerin' Contest in Spivey's Corner, North Carolina. His talent and those of others who participate in the contest keep the tradition of communicative hollers alive. These hollers were often used to signal specific events, call animals in, and request assistance in the rural areas of North Carolina.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 4, September 2015, p126-128,130, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24062
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Abstract:
Rural communities in North Carolina are in need of assistance by attorneys willing to do pro bono work. The NC Bar Association and Legal Aid of North Carolina (LANC) work together to provide a pro bono program called Lawyer on the Line (LOTL), a program where lawyers in larger communities offer phone service to individuals in the rural areas of the state.
Source:
North Carolina State Bar Journal (NoCar KF 200 N67), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Fall 2015, p29-31, 56, il
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Record #:
24431
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Abstract:
The Mast Farm Inn in Valle Crucis, North Carolina provides visitors with an idea of what life was like in an eighteenth century farm house.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 8, January 1993, p19-21, il
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Record #:
9801
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Abstract:
Using photographs from the beginning of the 20th-century, Dean describes farms harvests from that period.
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Record #:
28502
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Union County mother and educator Annemarie Bretz and her husband Shannen recently invested in a hobby farm. While they have no plans to give up their day jobs, they and their daughters are already enjoying the benefits of farm living and growing fruits and vegetables for themselves.
Record #:
29021
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Bellwood Extension & Community Association is a 102-year old community organization in northern Cleveland County. Formerly known as the Warlick Tomato Club, the group was founded in 1915 by home demonstration agents to teach farm girls and young women how to grow and can food in their homes. The history of the club and movement across the state are detailed and the history of the Bellwood club is told by Mary Jane Seagle and Jean Ann Privett.
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Record #:
30747
Author(s):
Abstract:
Parker Family Farms in Orange County is run by Renee and Randall Parker and their four children. As fewer family farms continue to operate in North Carolina, the Parkers hope to save their farm and their agricultural heritage. Several local farming programs have helped the family continue to grow tobacco and raise pigs and chickens.
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Record #:
31162
Author(s):
Abstract:
Benny and Annette Fountain recently opened Tarkil Branch Farm’s Homestead Museum in Duplin County, North Carolina. The museum is located on part of the working farm that has been in the Fountain family since 1912. The home of David and Ludie Fountain, Benny’s parents, showcases the preserved Dogtrot-style farmhouse from the 1830s and exhibits of farm life.
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Record #:
35212
Abstract:
In one account, the memory took place one May many years ago. In the other, it was a menagerie of memories part of farm life from distant days gone by. However, the authors of “Bovine Joy Ride” and “Christmas in May” prove the same point: childhood memories made special by fathers and shared with siblings.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
35221
Author(s):
Abstract:
As Bruce Boehmke author learned from his tractor named Pony, more was gained from the experience than the restoration of a piece of abandoned farm machinery. Among the benefits were the restoration of family relationships and fostering of new friendships.
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Record #:
35236
Abstract:
What makes a memory memorable, as these authors suggested, is having the extraordinary happen in the midst of the ordinary. For Rose Lagrow, it was finding a double yolk egg during gathering. For Lorna Scott, it involved her mother’s encounter with a runaway pig. For Letha Humphrey, it involved a dinner complete with picture taking.
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Record #:
35232
Abstract:
Tommy Hancock, David Whitman, and Thelma Outlaw proved in recollections of days gone by, distant and not so much, the importance of community. To them, community was expressed in activities such as barning tobacco, looking out for neighbors, or sharing homegrown produce.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
35808
Author(s):
Abstract:
Testament of the once prevalent agrarian culture was the building staple of family farms. Attesting its importance in family farm life were its many purposes, mostly practical. One not prosaic to the author was its ability, especially for children, to exude a mystique. This quality, helping rural life to possess a rustic charm, the author suggested also contributed to their lengthy history, continuing in the US through immigrants such as Scots and Swedes. It’s one that has generated long standing associations with other groups such as Mennonites and Amish.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p38-39