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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Southern identity
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Record #:
21533
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Abstract:
This article examines the Appalachian Southern identity during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Contrary to 20th century historians' ideas of Civil War-era Appalachia as the pre-modern, unionist, and anti-slavery society, an analysis of a 1911 Waynesville, North Carolina, reception for the widow of Confederate hero Thomas J. \"Stonewall\" Jackson demonstrates that Appalachian communities not only supported the Confederacy but retained a strong identification with the myth of the \"Lost Cause\" into the 1910s. In the 1890s and 1910s reunions of Confederate veterans and celebrations of their military service were central to the public life of Haywood County, North Carolina.
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Record #:
24966
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Jeffrey Leak describes his view of the black south from both his and his family’s perspective. Their similar but differing experiences help define distinctive southern and modern aspects of Charlotte identity.
Record #:
24967
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Jeremy Markovich describes the similarities he sees between Charlotte, NC and his native Ohio. Both regions have seen staple industries go bust with extensive job displacement and dislocation of families.
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Record #:
24965
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Tommy Tomlinson answers the question of whether Charlotte is truly southern. From the southern twang in speech, to the NFL team they host, all factors are considered to determine if Charlotte truly is a southern town.
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Record #:
32994
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Misunderstandings from all around Poughkeepsie, NY started when a local dormitory started flying a confederate flag. The dorm, referred to locally as The Rebel House, is the residence of North and South Carolinian students attending the Poughkeepsie Business School.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Jun 1938, p5, por
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Record #:
37008
Abstract:
For Kelly, the difference between supper and dinner is the food on the plate and the occasion being formal or informal. With those distinctions in mind, the author suggests that, since the South is a casual region, the evening meal should be called supper and never with a capital S.
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Record #:
36160
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A combination of written and photo documentation proved the time it took and process involved in a forest’s recovery from a set fire. Through his documentation, the author asserted this action, commonly done in the South every one to five years, can replenish and cleanse its landscape.