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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Fox squirrel
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Record #:
9121
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Abstract:
Eastern fox squirrels are the largest tree squirrels in the western hemisphere, weighing up to three pounds and having a body the size of a house cat. They are also strikingly colored in silver, gray, and black. In North Carolina they are an uncommon species, and development has taken much of their habitat in the longleaf pine forests of the Southeastern Coastal Plain. For that reason the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program has placed them on its watch list.
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Record #:
16436
Author(s):
Abstract:
The habitat of the fox squirrel, the larger and more colorful relative of the gray squirrel, has declined in the Southeastern Coastal Plain through unrestricted logging and a lack of controlled burning. Jones reports on a restoration project to begin at Cherry Point during January and February, 1997.
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Record #:
9151
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eastern fox squirrels are the largest tree squirrels in the western hemisphere, weighing up to three pounds and having a body the size of a house cat. They are also strikingly colored in silver, gray, and black. This squirrel prefers open timber and small groves of nut trees or long leaf pines instead heavily forested areas. Fox squirrels are rare in North Carolina, but some sections produce enough to satisfy hunters. Still, their number had declined to such a degree in 1973-74, that the hunting season was closed on them.
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Record #:
9192
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Barkalow compares the habits, life histories, descriptions, foods, and management of two members of North Carolina's squirrel family--the gray and fox squirrels.
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Record #:
8761
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eastern fox squirrels are the largest tree squirrels in the western hemisphere, weighing up to three pounds and being strikingly colored in silver, gray, and black. In North Carolina they are native to the longleaf pine forests of the Southeastern Coastal Plain. Eastern fox squirrels have been known since colonial times and were described and painted by Catesby and Audubon. Yet they are not as well known as the western fox squirrel, that weighs under two pounds and ranges from the Appalachians to the Rockies. The authors discuss what they have learned from their nine-year study of the eastern fox squirrel.
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Record #:
36160
Author(s):
Abstract:
A combination of written and photo documentation proved the time it took and process involved in a forest’s recovery from a set fire. Through his documentation, the author asserted this action, commonly done in the South every one to five years, can replenish and cleanse its landscape.