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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Squirrels
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Record #:
9121
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Abstract:
Eastern fox squirrels are the largest tree squirrels in the western hemisphere, weighing up to three pounds and having a body the size of a house cat. They are also strikingly colored in silver, gray, and black. In North Carolina they are an uncommon species, and development has taken much of their habitat in the longleaf pine forests of the Southeastern Coastal Plain. For that reason the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program has placed them on its watch list.
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Record #:
9396
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lee describes the red squirrel. It is half the size of the gray squirrel and lives in the western counties of the state in forests above 3,500 feet.
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Record #:
18586
Author(s):
Abstract:
Squirrels are highly sensitive to smells and use their noses in a number of ways, such as finding a mate, determining when territory is claimed by another squirrel, and locating buried nuts.
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Record #:
26344
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has begun making squirrel dens on several tracts of game land in the hopes of increasing the populations.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Summer 1978, p20
Subject(s):
Record #:
9151
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eastern fox squirrels are the largest tree squirrels in the western hemisphere, weighing up to three pounds and having a body the size of a house cat. They are also strikingly colored in silver, gray, and black. This squirrel prefers open timber and small groves of nut trees or long leaf pines instead heavily forested areas. Fox squirrels are rare in North Carolina, but some sections produce enough to satisfy hunters. Still, their number had declined to such a degree in 1973-74, that the hunting season was closed on them.
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Record #:
6054
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to three species of tree squirrels. The gray squirrel is the most abundant and familiar of trio. The red squirrel is common only in the mountains. The elusive fox squirrel, the largest of the group, is found mostly in the southeastern pine forests.
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Record #:
8761
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eastern fox squirrels are the largest tree squirrels in the western hemisphere, weighing up to three pounds and being strikingly colored in silver, gray, and black. In North Carolina they are native to the longleaf pine forests of the Southeastern Coastal Plain. Eastern fox squirrels have been known since colonial times and were described and painted by Catesby and Audubon. Yet they are not as well known as the western fox squirrel, that weighs under two pounds and ranges from the Appalachians to the Rockies. The authors discuss what they have learned from their nine-year study of the eastern fox squirrel.
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Record #:
4899
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to three species of tree squirrels. Red squirrels, also called \"boomers,\" are found in the mountains, while the gray squirrel inhabits the Piedmont area. Occupying the Coastal Plain is the largest of the squirrels, the fox squirrel, which measures between twenty and twenty-six inches.
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Record #:
26779
Abstract:
In North Carolina, the fox squirrel is twice the size of the local gray squirrel and is usually found in open hardwood forests. While little is known about the fox squirrel’s general ecology, eastern populations seem to be disappearing.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 4, July/Aug 1983, p11-15
Subject(s):