NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Sharpe, Terry
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
16767
Author(s):
Abstract:
Landowners who want to promote wildlife conservation sometimes feel those who provide help are speaking in code. For example, a landowner who goes to the FSA office has a choice of CRP, WRP, EQIP, FIP, SIP, or WHIP programs. Sharpe provides a quick review of the agencies and programs.
Full Text:
Record #:
16772
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sharpe reports on hunting data for the 1988-1999 hunting season for bobwhite quail and ruffled grouse.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
8761
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eastern fox squirrels are the largest tree squirrels in the western hemisphere, weighing up to three pounds and being strikingly colored in silver, gray, and black. In North Carolina they are native to the longleaf pine forests of the Southeastern Coastal Plain. Eastern fox squirrels have been known since colonial times and were described and painted by Catesby and Audubon. Yet they are not as well known as the western fox squirrel, that weighs under two pounds and ranges from the Appalachians to the Rockies. The authors discuss what they have learned from their nine-year study of the eastern fox squirrel.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9866
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sharpe discusses the benefits of hedgerows to wildlife. These rangy thickets of natural plants divide fields or run along the edge of a forest, providing food and shelter smaller wildlife.
Full Text:
Record #:
3630
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before the 1970s, quail were abundant for Sandhills' hunters, but the population has rapidly declined since then. One possible answer is that the number of naturally occurring fires, which can revitalize wildlife habitats, have been controlled by man.
Full Text:
Record #:
5954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the mid-20th-century, small game, including quail and rabbits, has been declining in the state. To stem this loss, the North Carolina Division of Wildlife and Management established a program called CURE, or Cooperative Upland-Habitat Restoration and Enhancement. Pipkin and Sharpe discuss the program's progress on game lands, including Sandhills, Suggs Mill Pond, South Mountain, and on public lands.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
26527
Abstract:
Eight North Carolina farms are currently participating in a special wildlife management project in which they are willing to modify farm operations to increase wildlife populations on their land. Each farm is managed to fulfill the needs of the landowners and also improve wildlife habitat.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 3, May/June 1990, p14, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26779
Abstract:
In North Carolina, the fox squirrel is twice the size of the local gray squirrel and is usually found in open hardwood forests. While little is known about the fox squirrel’s general ecology, eastern populations seem to be disappearing.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 4, July/Aug 1983, p11-15
Subject(s):