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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Estes, Rick
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Record #:
9671
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The white bass is not native to North Carolina, but it was introduced in the 1950s and 60s into lakes and reservoirs in the Piedmont and mountains counties. Most are caught there. Estes discusses how to fish for them year-round, what lures to use, and places to catch them.
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Record #:
9707
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The Mead Corporation's Paperboard Mill in Sylva was a major employer for over forty years. It also poured tons of waste into the Tuckasegee River, making the waterway nearly lifeless between Sylva and Fontana Lake. Eventually, a confrontation developed between pro-industry and pro-environment factions. Estes discusses the dispute and its resolution.
Record #:
9714
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Many environmental groups in North Carolina work on behalf of specific rivers or a specific wildlife species. Estes discusses some of the most effective ones in the state, including the Conservation Council of North Carolina, the North Carolina Nature Conservancy, and the Eno River Association.
Record #:
9543
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Near Asheboro the largest natural habitat zoo in the world is under construction. Over 200 animals are already in residence. Este gives an update on the zoo's progress.
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Record #:
6054
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North Carolina is home to three species of tree squirrels. The gray squirrel is the most abundant and familiar of trio. The red squirrel is common only in the mountains. The elusive fox squirrel, the largest of the group, is found mostly in the southeastern pine forests.
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Record #:
9752
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Ten wren species inhabit the country, and six of them live in North Carolina--the house, Carolina, Bewick's, long-billed, short-billed, and winter wren.
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Record #:
9803
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Estes describes the red squirrel. It is half the size of the gray squirrel and lives in the western counties of the state in forests above 3,500 feet. This squirrel is very territorial and chatters unceasingly at any person or animal that enters its grounds. This noisy behavior has earned it the nickname “boomer.”
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