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28 results for Water--Pollution
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Record #:
1330
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Soil and Water Conservation Commission has adopted temporary guidelines for implementing the state's non-discharge rule as it applies to animal waste management operations.
Record #:
1497
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using three marina collection sites and three open water collection sites, Byers provides evidence that significant zinc and copper bioaccumulation is occurring in certain marine invertebrates in marinas.
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Record #:
2171
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's major pulp, paper, and mining industries are making a concerted effort to control pollution and improve the environment. Champion International now releases cleaner water into the Pigeon River, facilitating the river's recreational use.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 3, Mar 1995, p12-17, il
Record #:
3438
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fish kills occur in a number of the state's waterways. Precautions individuals should observe include not collecting any fish for consumption, avoiding swimming in nearby water, and keeping pets away from the area.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Summer 1997, p7, il
Record #:
3450
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1996, the General Assembly created the N.C. Clean Water Management Trust Fund to deal with water pollution. The fund provides grants to groups for such projects as the restoration of degraded lands and building of riparian buffers.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 47 Issue 5, May 1997, p1,12, il, f
Record #:
4020
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rapid growth and development on steep mountain slopes threatens water quality in the western counties. Development, along with timbering and agricultural activity, causes sedimentation or erosion and deposition of soil into creeks and rivers.
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Record #:
4569
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's rivers are troubled. In 1999, there were 54 reported fish kills in which over 1.3 million fish died. Erosion and sedimentation affect river basins; the Tar River is the most affected by these two factors. Nonpoint source water pollution, or runoff from farms, lawns, construction sites, and parking lots, underlies major pollution problems. On the positive side, mandatory and enforceable programs help curb the runoff problem.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Spring 2000, p3
Record #:
4833
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mercury is one of the earth's most poisonous substances. Coal-fired power plants, medical and municipal incinerators, and some mercury-using, chemical manufacturing plants contribute highly to North Carolina's mercury pollution problems. Because of elevated mercury levels in fish over the past decade, the state has issued advisories to avoid eating fish in ten eastern streams and one species in the Atlantic Ocean.
Record #:
5291
Author(s):
Abstract:
Restoring degraded inland streams is critical to protecting the health of the state's estuarine systems. Rocky Branch, which flows a mile through the North Carolina State University campus before emptying into Walnut Creek, was designated in 1978 as \"the most polluted urban stream in North Carolina.\" Smith describes the steps being taken at a cost of $4 million to restore this once pristine waterway.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2002, p11-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5484
Author(s):
Abstract:
For years, water quality in the state was threatened by point source pollution, readily identifiable culprits like factories, large-scale farming, and leaking sewage treatment plants. While improvement is being made in these areas, new nonpoint sources, like urban and construction site runoff, are causes for concern. Deen examines this new threat.
Record #:
6726
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sediment is the number one pollution concern across North Carolina. It is the largest nonpoint-source pollutant in the state and one of the main reasons surface water quality has deteriorated. Lane discusses causes of sedimentation and what can be done to prevent or alleviate it.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Spring 2004, p1-2, il
Record #:
7647
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Ward Transformer Company plant in Raleigh first gained notoriety in 1978 when 30,000 gallons of PCBs from the site were illegally dumped. Prevented from transporting the contaminated material for resale, the contacted company sprayed the material over 200 miles of North Carolina roadside. The state cleaned it up and transported the soil to a Warren County landfill. The site leaked and polluted the soil, water, and fish of a number of waterways. The effects of the contamination are being felt today. Crabtree Lake and surrounding waterways are under a fish consumption advisory. Recent testing has found unacceptable levels of PCBs leaking from the plant.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 3, Jan 2006, p11 Periodical Website
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Record #:
7718
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stormwater runoff is a major pollution problem for shellfish farms. Home construction in coastal areas is growing. More people mean more roads, driveways, and parking lots. Water running over these impervious surfaces picks up contaminants such as oil, sand, chemicals, and fertilizers and deposits them in nearby rivers and streams. The more contaminants the harder it is for shellfish to grow. Reconciling the demand for development and the need for healthy shellfish is a challenge facing coastal planners.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2006, p6-9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7919
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly passed the Clean Smokestacks Act almost four years ago to clean up soot and smog-forming pollution from coal-fired power plants. While the act requires power plants to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions from 245,000 tons in 1998 to 56,000 tons by 2009, it does not say what to do about mercury pollution from those plants. Most of the mercury pollution from these plants falls into nearby water bodies, where, in North Carolina, it is quickly converted to its most toxic form. Suttles discusses what needs to be done to reduce this form of pollution which makes some state fish inedible and threatens developing brains and central nervous systems of young children.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p1, 10, il
Record #:
9707
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mead Corporation's Paperboard Mill in Sylva was a major employer for over forty years. It also poured tons of waste into the Tuckasegee River, making the waterway nearly lifeless between Sylva and Fontana Lake. Eventually, a confrontation developed between pro-industry and pro-environment factions. Estes discusses the dispute and its resolution.