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15 results for Fish kills
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Record #:
226
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Scientists have identified an algae that might be responsible for the recent large fish kills in Eastern North Carolina.
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Record #:
3438
Author(s):
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Fish kills occur in a number of the state's waterways. Precautions individuals should observe include not collecting any fish for consumption, avoiding swimming in nearby water, and keeping pets away from the area.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Summer 1997, p7, il
Record #:
25071
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jim Rice is studying the effects of hypoxia and how it affects juvenile fish in particular. Rice has several hypotheses he is testing to figure out just how hypoxia effects the growth rate of spot, a bottom dwelling fish.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2010, p18-22, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25133
Author(s):
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A large fish kill’s cause cannot be found. The only clue found is sores on the dead fish. A solution is highly sought after so an investigation will ensue.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1985, p1, 4
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Record #:
25167
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Fish kills have always been a natural part of things, but the question is whether they are becoming more frequent due to intervention by man.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Fall 1987, p1, 6
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Record #:
25189
Author(s):
Abstract:
The culprit of the fish kills for over a decade may be dinoflagellates. These dinoflagellates can lay dormant for long periods of time and disappear soon after killing fish which is why researchers have had trouble narrowing down the cause of the kills.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Winter 1992, p1, 5, il
Record #:
25224
Author(s):
Abstract:
An advisory council has warned that with the heavy rainfall and increase in nutrients, the time is ripe for another fish kill to occur. In response, Governor Jim Hunt announced a clean water budget plan.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Summer 1998, p2
Record #:
26665
Abstract:
Commercial fish landings on the Pamlico have decreased significantly in the past twenty years. Other problems for coastal North Carolina include shoreline erosion, loss of submerged vegetation, and runoff from agricultural land dumps.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1986, p4-5, il
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Record #:
9676
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many of the state's rivers, streams, and lakes experience fish kills every year. Taylor discusses a large fish kill that occurred in July 1980 on the Neuse River in Wake County and how the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission determines the extent of a kill. A list of major fish kills between 1976-1980 is included.
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Record #:
26948
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Abstract:
Investigations are underway by the North Carolina Division of Environmental Management to determine who is responsible for a major fish kill that occurred at Beaverdam Creek Reservoir in northern Wake County. Thousands of fish died when the City of Raleigh drained the lake at the request of the Corps of Engineers. Officials said a fish kill could have been prevented if a permit had been obtained.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept/Oct 1982, p11
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Record #:
28081
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than 13 million fish died in “fish kill events” in North Carolina in 2009 - the most since that data has been collected. The estimate is conservative and could actually be double the total. Graphs detailing the annual fish kill events from 1997 to 2009 and the reported annual fish kill mortality from 1997 to 2009 are presented. Most of the fish kill events occurred as a result of low oxygen in the water and pollution.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 51, December 2009, p6 Periodical Website
Record #:
28427
Abstract:
Greenfield Lake in Wilmington, North Carolina has experienced recent problems with algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen levels, and fish kills. Many of these issues have likely been caused by high nutrient loading. This study examined lake sediment as a source and sink for phosphorus, the nutrient most often responsible for freshwater eutrophication.
Record #:
33464
Author(s):
Abstract:
The release of more than a million gallons of dairy waste which killed most of the fish and aquatic life in a section of the Neuse River in November points up a significant potential for pollution. This was the worst fish kill ever attributed to an animal waste spill in the state. The cities of Goldsboro and Smithfield were advised not to draw drinking water from the Neuse for several days.
Record #:
34239
Author(s):
Abstract:
Heavy late-spring and early-summer rainfall in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of North Carolina has sent high volumes of nitrogen-laden freshwater down the Neuse River. This has resulted in numerous, small, localized crab and fish kills and several sizeable algae blooms in the estuary near Morehead City.
Record #:
34272
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists are uncertain whether fish kills in the Neuse River are caused by Pfiesteria or anoxia/hypoxia. Difficulties in the causal linkages make it difficult to determine appropriate response and management actions. This article discusses the fish kill events and water conditions in the Neuse.