NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Pamlico Sound
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1120
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study (APES) is an intensive analysis of the Albemarle and Pamlico sounds with the goal of finding ways to manage these estuaries to conserve their valuable ecological functions.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Sept/Oct 1992, p8-10, por
Record #:
4725
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hurricanes have struck North Carolina for centuries, destroying lives, property, and the environment. However, it is only recently that scientists seek to understand a hurricane's ecological effect. For example, Hurricane Floyd's flood washed human and natural contaminants into the Pamlico Sound; the sound's salinity also decreased 50 percent, and the chlorophyll level elevated. Scientists are studying these and other effects to learn what it means for the future of the sound and those who depend on it.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 4, Sept 2000, p98-102, 104-105, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
17723
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pamlico Sound, the largest body of water in the four distinct coastal regions of North Carolina, is known as the fishing gem of the state. As a prime habitat for numerous aquatic animals and vegetation, the Pamlico Sound is a strategic habitat area for the North Carolina Coastal Habitat Protection Plan.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2012, p12-17, map, f Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
19368
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds of North Carolina are dynamic mergers of water, wind, and currents that prompt the growth of many fish species. Edgerton discusses how fish migration into these sounds from birth in the Gulf of Mexico.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Feb 1990, p2-3, map, f Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
24469
Author(s):
Abstract:
A boy reveals what it was like crossing the Pamlico Sound in the 1930s from Washington, North Carolina to Ocracoke.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 2, July 1991, p34-36, por
Full Text:
Record #:
26665
Abstract:
Commercial fish landings on the Pamlico have decreased significantly in the past twenty years. Other problems for coastal North Carolina include shoreline erosion, loss of submerged vegetation, and runoff from agricultural land dumps.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1986, p4-5, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
731
Author(s):
Abstract:
Serious trouble stalks two of the nation's largest estuarine areas, threatening the state's eastern economy and environment. Our best hope for restoration may lie with the five-year Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study.
Full Text:
Record #:
941
Author(s):
Abstract:
A management plan released by the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study would restore the sickly Pamlico and Albemarle sounds.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
33472
Author(s):
Abstract:
A five-year study designed to reverse the trend of increasing pollution and declining fisheries in the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds is now entering its initial research phase. The Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study is being conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuarine Program and the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development. Research will identify causes of pollution problems and implications to management strategies.
Record #:
34322
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following record rainfall along the North Carolina coast caused by three sequential hurricanes (Dennis, Floyd and Irene) in fall of 1999, scientists began analyzing the impacts of the freshwater inputs to Pamlico Sound and speculating about the ecological consequences. They found that after the three storms passed over the watershed, nutrient-laden floodwaters displaced a large volume of Pamlico Sound and stimulated phytoplankton growth in the system. Weather experts predict that climate change and an increase in hurricane activity could seriously disrupt ecosystems critical for fishery resources, economic development, and habitability of the coastal zone.
Record #:
35809
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted first were reasons to appreciate the Coast and its waters, particularly sites that lend appeal. Land marks ranged from the well-known Outer Banks to perhaps lesser known Bird’s Island. Towns included famed Kittyhawk to the famed by relatively few Duck. As for what he saw as evidence of being taken for granted: pollution of air and water, destruction to dunes and wildlife. Out of an enduring appreciation for, and mounting concern about, he called for all North Carolinians to restore the Coast and its waters for future generations and out of a sacred duty.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p40-42, 56-60
Record #:
38298
Author(s):
Abstract:
Called sound country by the author, North Carolina attained this status by having more sounds than any other state in the east. Its importance may be better defined, however, by the role that sounds like Currituck have played in defining a way of life for Eastern North Carolinians and the region’s seafood industry for centuries.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p96-98, 100, 102-104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114 Periodical Website
Record #:
38281
Author(s):
Abstract:
The county seat of Tyrrell County is also the only town in the county, which was founded in 1793. It’s also defined as one is its identity as a singular town—one doctor, one lawyer, one pharmacy, one road. How it’s defined as two: Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds forming the second largest estuary in the country; two animals, the red wolf and red cockaded woodpecker, being protected species.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p46-50, 52, 54, 56-58, 60, 62, 64-65 Periodical Website