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17 results for Agricultural wastes--Environmental aspects
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Record #:
2190
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Tillery residents' fear over contamination of their drinking water by swine operations has resulted in the Halifax County town being selected as one of eight test sites for the Groundwater Guardian Program.
Record #:
2239
Author(s):
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An NCSU study of older, unlined swine lagoons in the state's coastal plain revealed that over half of them leak contaminants into groundwater. The researchers recommended using synthetic liners in cases where self-sealing lagoons are inadequate.
Record #:
2240
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Abstract:
A comparison of animal waste regulations relating to drinking water wells in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia reveals that North Carolina has the least restrictive regulations of the four states.
Record #:
2522
Author(s):
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Inattention to swine waste lagoons of the state's proliferating hog industry resulted in spills in 1995 that damaged the environment. State government reaction has been minimal.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Fall 1995, p5-6, il, bibl
Record #:
2808
Author(s):
Abstract:
Environmental groups, including the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation, held the N.C. Hog Summit in New Bern in the spring of 1996 to discuss the impact of hog waste on the environment. A partial list of recommendations is included.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 15 Issue 3, Spring 1996, p1-4, il
Record #:
2937
Author(s):
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The 1996 General Assembly Short Session passed S1217, an Act to Implement Recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Agricultural Waste, to deal with animal waste disposal.
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Record #:
2975
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Because large-sized industrial hog farms are still considered \"family farms\" under the law, county governments have difficulty regulating them. A new approach of control, enacting health ordinances, is proving effective.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 15 Issue 4, Summer 1996, p1-2, il
Record #:
3496
Author(s):
Abstract:
Problems facing broiler producers who use dry litter waste disposal systems include a reduction in acreage of crops using it; its high concentration of zinc and copper, which can make soil toxic to plants; and competition for markets by wastewater sludge.
Record #:
3628
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cooperation between the New Zealand government and the pork industry resulted in more effective swine waste management practices. Consideration of such practices could provide ways to improve hog waste management in the state.
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Record #:
4687
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To protect the environment and deal with swine waste, Johnston County farmer Julian Barham turned to technology for solutions. The farm handles 4,000 sows, and hog waste is collected in a two-acre, twenty-feet deep lagoon. Technology allows methane gas collection to generate electricity and provide warm water to heat the farm's 7,500 tomato plant greenhouses. Other byproducts include reusable water for the farm and carbon dioxide for the greenhouses.
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Record #:
8003
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Mike Williams, director of the Animal and Poultry Waste Management Center at North Carolina State University, discusses what is wrong with the way hog waste is currently handled and what alternatives are available. He found five that work well enough, but they're all too expensive.
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Record #:
12298
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Thomas and Robert Butler have turned their 108-acre family farm in Harnett County from tobacco to hog raising. To protect the environment and deal with swine waste, the Butlers are promoting a hog waste storage system that benefits the environment by cutting down on greenhouse emissions and transforming animal waste into electricity. This approach has attracted attention from around the nation.
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Record #:
33464
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The release of more than a million gallons of dairy waste which killed most of the fish and aquatic life in a section of the Neuse River in November points up a significant potential for pollution. This was the worst fish kill ever attributed to an animal waste spill in the state. The cities of Goldsboro and Smithfield were advised not to draw drinking water from the Neuse for several days.
Record #:
34213
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Agricultural Cost Share Program helped install twice as many animal waste management structures in 1992 as it had in any previous year. The increase can be attributed to farmers anticipating implementation of new nondischarge regulations, and pressure on farmers to make their animal operations environmentally sound.
Record #:
34215
Author(s):
Abstract:
In December 1992, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission adopted revisions to rules governing waste treatment systems that do not discharge to surface waters. The rules require that animal production operations above specified sizes file with the Division of Environmental Management certification that they have obtained and implemented approved plans for managing their waste.