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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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53 results for Taylor, Mark
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Record #:
744
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Crumbling dams and abandoned millstones are all that remain of the ancient gristmill trade that shaped NC.
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Record #:
8731
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As part of North Carolina's 400th anniversary celebration, Governor James G. Martin declared 1986 the “Year of the Native American” in North Carolina. Taylor discusses what archaeologists, like East Carolina University's David Phelps and David Green, are discovering about the Siouan and Algonkian cultures. These tribes flourished in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain but left few obvious signs of their occupation. By the early 1700s, they had been eliminated by European settlement.
Record #:
9724
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Jay Norwood “Ding” Darling is remembered today as one of this country's great conservationists. He was instrumental in founding the National Wildlife Federation, established the national wildlife refuge system, and made the federal “duck stamp” a reality. He was also an accomplished political cartoonist. Taylor discusses some of his biting cartoons and their influence on conservation.
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Record #:
9716
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The Coastal Area Management Act was enacted by the North Carolina General Assembly to regulate development in areas of environmental concern in sounds, estuaries, wetlands, barrier islands, and beaches. Taylor examines the plan after nine years of operation.
Record #:
9754
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Seven aquatic plants threaten some of North Carolina's best waterways. They are the hydrilla, spike rush, elodea, pondweed, filamentous algae, bladderwort, and alligatorweed.
Record #:
9819
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Taylor discusses what archaeologists have learned about the state's history by studying the clues early inhabitants left behind at places including Phelps Lake, Roanoke Island, Orange County, and Town Creek Indian Mound.
Record #:
14014
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission selected a painting of a drake and hen mallard as the design for the first stamp in the state's waterfowl stamp and print program. Richard Plasschaert, a well-known wildlife artist from Minnesota, painted the picture.
Record #:
9504
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Rabies broke out in northern Florida in the 1960s and has been moving steadily northward. The disease, which is being carried solely by raccoons, has now reached South Carolina. Health officials estimate that it will spread into North Carolina in the near future.
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Record #:
9529
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Corporations are purchasing large tracts of land on the Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula for the purpose of building superfarms in counties including Dare, Tyrrell, Washington, Hyde, and Beaufort. Taylor examines how these farms are changing the landscape of eastern North Carolina and how it might affect the state's wildlife and marine ecology.
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Record #:
9535
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Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout National Seashores provide the state with coastal wilderness stretching over 136 miles and the largest unspoiled beaches left in the country. Fishing is one of the most popular recreations there. Wildlife is abundant, and most of the villages located near them have retained their charm.
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Record #:
9545
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission received a grant of over $500,000 from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the study of the state's endangered species. Alligators, brown pelicans, red-cockaded woodpeckers, and Neuse River water dogs are just a few of the animals the Commission will study.
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Record #:
9631
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Duane Raver, Jr. is one of the most widely recognized wildlife artists in the nation. He is retiring in July 1979 as editor of WILDLIFE IN NORTH CAROLINA to pursue a career as a full-time free-lance wildlife artist.
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Record #:
9551
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Taylor discusses the career of Gilbert Pearson, one of North Carolina's and the nation's most effective wildlife conservationists. He was the first man to achieve significant success in developing an effective program of wildlife protection for the state. He was also a leader in the fight to ban market and plume hunting which feathers widely used in women's hats.
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Record #:
9552
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Taylor reports on the state's ongoing deer restoration project. The first serious attempts at restoration took place in the 1890s on the Biltmore Estate near Asheville. By the 1930s there were only a few thousand left in North Carolina. However, current work by the North Carolina Wildlife resources Commission has brought the statewide population back to between 400,000 and 500,000.
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Record #:
9553
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In a recent survey by the Tennessee Valley Authority, titled “Where the Water Isn't Clean Anymore,” three North Carolina Rivers have been named as problem areas--the Pigeon River, North Toe, and Nolichucky.
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