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16 results for Boone, Daniel, 1734-1820
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Record #:
3323
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although his name is more often linked with the state of Kentucky, Daniel Boone and his family lived in the western part of the state from 1751 to 1775. He was well known for his marksmanship and hunting skills.
Record #:
7973
Author(s):
Abstract:
Daniel Boone came to western North Carolina in 1752 at the age of eighteen and remained there for twenty-one years. On August 14, 1756, he married Rebecca Bryan, a marriage that would last fifty-seven years. In 2006, each of the sites in the state associated with him are holding special events in his honor. Living history reenactments, family festivals, exhibits, and trade fairs are planned for Salisbury, Boone, Wilkesboro, Statesville, Bethabara, and Boone's Cave Park.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 7, July 2006, p56, il
Record #:
8107
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legend has it that Daniel Boone lived in a log cabin near the Yadkin River in Davidson County and took refuge from Indians in a nearby cave. Now called Boone's Cave State Park, this 110-acres park falls short of the 400-acre minimum for a state park. The state says there is no real evidence that Daniel Boone ever occupied the territory and is ready to stop funding of the park. A local dentist named Dr. Wade Sowers has been collecting historical material to prove Boone did actually live there. A second replica of Boone's cabin was built by the Daniel Boone Memorial Association after the first was burned by vandals. A park office was added, as well as restrooms, a picnic area, and wooden steps leading down to the cave. But the state's interest in the park is waning and it stopped counting visitors in 1983. Both the state and surrounding counties agree that the territory is part of North Carolina's heritage and should be preserved.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 53 Issue 7, Dec 1985, p18-20, por
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Record #:
10274
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Abstract:
Draughn discusses the outdoor drama, THUNDERLAND, which is based on the life of Daniel Boone and covers his fight to open up and hold the mountain lands of western North Carolina for settlers and pioneers. Herbert (Hubert) Hayes, the play's author, is a direct descendant of Daniel Boone. The drama is performed in Asheville.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 10 Issue 3, July 1952, p24-25, 27, il, por
Record #:
12344
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Wilkinson Cabin, thought to have been built by a man named Reese in 1760, is the oldest home in Watauga County. Today, is it located on Highway 421, which was formerly part of the Daniel Boone Trail. Through the years buffaloes, Native Americans, settlers, soldiers, pioneers heading west, and Daniel Boone passed by this historic structure.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 5, Oct 1974, p26-28, il
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Record #:
14188
Abstract:
Although born in Pennsylvania and spending many years in the wilderness of Kentucky, Daniel Boone never forgot where he spent most of his boyhood days.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 38, Feb 1950, p6, 20, f
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Record #:
14614
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Historian Major J. Hampton Rich researched Daniel Boone's activity specific to North Carolina. Boone's family moved to North Carolina from Pennsylvania after Boone's birth in 1734. Rich's research focuses on Boone's exploration of the state, and various encounters, both violent and peaceful, with the Native American population in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 23, Nov 1946, p7, 22
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Record #:
15447
Abstract:
Piedmont, North Carolina is rich in historic landmarks. Among these are Trading Ford, Boone's Cave, the Old Stone Wall, and Sapona. Trading Ford was located where the old trading path crossed the Yadkin River; there the Sapona Indians had an important trading post where traders stopped to trade and recruit. Sapona is located on the Davidson County side of the Yadkin River and was the headquarters and principle town of the Sapona Tribe. Tradition tells us that Boone's Cave is where Daniel Boone hid upon being pursued by Indians.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 32, Jan 1937, p26
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Record #:
17140
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Abstract:
Many people associate the name Daniel Boone with Kentucky; however, the Boone family came from Pennsylvania to North Carolina in 1750. Tucker recounts the years this intrepid and far-traveling explorer spent in the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 20, Oct 1938, p5, 20, 22, il
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Record #:
23816
Abstract:
Long before opening Kentucky, the pioneer, Daniel Boone, was active in western North Carolina. His explorations opened the way for settling lands west of the mountains.
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Record #:
22058
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This article describes a 1775 scheme to acquire, settle, and hold a large piece of land, called \"Transylvania County,\" lying between the Kentucky and Cumberland rivers, in what is now Tennessee and Kentucky. Details include Boonesborough's establishment by a group of men led by North Carolina Judge Richard Henderson and frontiersman Daniel Boone. A reprint of Henderson's journal documenting his journey into this territory is included.
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Record #:
9629
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Although his name is more often linked with the state of Kentucky, Daniel Boone and his family lived in the western part of the state from 1751 to 1775.
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Record #:
720
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Nearly everyone knows Daniel Boone helped settle Kentucky, but few know that this famous frontiersman lived much of his life in North Carolina.
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Record #:
31655
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A new 4-H camp site in Mulberry Valley, Caldwell County was a memorial gift of Mr. and Mrs. Luther Robinson of Lenoir, who lost their only two children to polio. The uniqueness of the camp lies in the fact that it will be used for primitive camping. The property was where the Robinson children were born, and has historical significance because the land once belonged to Israel Boone, a brother of Daniel Boone, from whom Mrs. Robinson is a fifth generation descendant.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Jan 1974, p22, por
Record #:
35485
Author(s):
Abstract:
Story, in this case, crossed the line between fiction and non-fiction. the author noted that her grandmother Mary Casey was a “walking, talking, history book of the Outer Banks.” More history than story can be perceived in recollections that included references to Daniel Boone and the unsavory early days of Hyde County.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p30-33, 41