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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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48 results for Water quality
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Record #:
238
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission voted to send to public hearing a proposed modification of rules that govern waste disposal systems that do not discharge to surface waters.
Record #:
328
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As the population grows, water supply needs increase as do the sources of pollution. The challenge of protecting water quality and ensuring an adequate water supply must be accepted and acted upon by the state.
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Record #:
3695
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The N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources' new enforcement policies for wastewater overflows include reporting releases immediately and giving regional offices more authority. Policies become effective July 1, 1998.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Apr 1998, p1,3-4, il
Record #:
4569
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's rivers are troubled. In 1999, there were 54 reported fish kills in which over 1.3 million fish died. Erosion and sedimentation affect river basins; the Tar River is the most affected by these two factors. Nonpoint source water pollution, or runoff from farms, lawns, construction sites, and parking lots, underlies major pollution problems. On the positive side, mandatory and enforceable programs help curb the runoff problem.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Spring 2000, p3
Record #:
4841
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Since the enactment of the Clean Water Act in 1972 by Congress, North Carolina has sought to improve the quality of its water. Smith reviews the progress that has been made, beginning with the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2000, p16-20, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5484
Author(s):
Abstract:
For years, water quality in the state was threatened by point source pollution, readily identifiable culprits like factories, large-scale farming, and leaking sewage treatment plants. While improvement is being made in these areas, new nonpoint sources, like urban and construction site runoff, are causes for concern. Deen examines this new threat.
Record #:
6764
Author(s):
Abstract:
The national Clean Marina Program was adopted by North Carolina in 2000. \"To qualify,\" says Mike Lopazanski, N.C. Division of Coastal Management coastal and policy analyst, \"marina operators must demonstrate that they voluntarily employ the best management and operation techniques that go beyond and above regulatory requirements.\" Marinas that fly the Clean Marina Flag signal to all that they are safeguarding the environment. Dalton's Yacht Service, Inc., located on Whitaker Creek in Oriental, was the first marina in the state to receive the Clean Marina designation.
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Record #:
7821
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North Carolina faces over $6.5 billion in needed water and sewer construction over the next five years because of a growing population, an aging infrastructure system, and stricter health and environmental regulations. Hall, president of the North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center, discusses how this enormous need might be funded.
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Record #:
8180
Author(s):
Abstract:
Standards for treating drinking water and wastewater in the country are becoming stricter. At the same time the pipes and related conduits that bring drinking water to and take wastewater away from the home or business are wearing out. Some of these underground systems have been doing their jobs for over one hundred years. Burgess discusses the problems created in dealing with water infrastructure replacement when federal mandates, like the Clean Water Act, are either underfunded, unfunded, or cut by Congress.
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Record #:
15639
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Falls Lake is required to meet the Environmental Protection Agency's most basic water classification determined by the Clean Water Act--that it be swimmable and fishable. But the lake doesn't meet that standard. Since 2010, Falls Lake, including the lower portion where Raleigh gets its drinking water, has failed state and federal water quality standards. The Falls Lake rules are supposed to fix that.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 18, May 2011, p14-17, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
15871
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Since 1984, Clean Water for North Carolina has built alliances with disadvantaged communities, which lack the power and influence of lobbyists and lawmakers. Their latest concern: fracking and its economic, social, and environmental costs.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 3, Jan 2012, p15-17, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
19366
Abstract:
North Carolina's Sea Grant Program is starting the 1990s off with a bang. Research projects will be solving water quality problems, developing new seafood products, discovery why fish stocks fluctuate, and building aquaculture into a successful enterprise in the state.
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Record #:
24489
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Abstract:
In the 1980s, only 500 people lived in Rolesville, North Carolina, but by 2004, the population had doubled in size. Much of this growth is due to Raleigh’s explosive expansion in the 1990s as well as the establishment of a comprehensive water and sewer system for northeastern Wake County in the 1990s. The system opened northeast Wake County—Rolesville in particular—to residential development, but residents still hold onto their small town’s history.
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Record #:
24818
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Barbra Doll, a water protection and restoration specialist, has developed a new technique for filtering sediments and nutrients from runoff. This technique, called regenerative stormwater conveyance has already been applied at some locations and a video demonstration is available. The demonstration was conducted at a family farm in Randolph County.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2016, p24-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25091
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Citizen collected research is not an uncommon occurrence. Those people helping to collect data on water quality speak about what they learn from both the project and each other. In addition, the pros and cons of participatory research are discussed.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2013, p28-31, il, por Periodical Website