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11 results for Algae blooms--Monitoring
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Record #:
9010
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The Southeast Phytoplankton Monitoring Network monitors harmful algae blossoms in ocean water. Recently student volunteers from First Flight High School in Kill Devil Hills, who were monitoring phytoplankton at an open-ocean site in Duck, discovered a species of harmful algae. Green discusses the monitoring network and the students' findings.
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Record #:
24734
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A team of marine biologists and researchers collected seaweed samples in Onslow County to study the levels of the toxic algae, Gambierdiscus, in North Carolina waters. The algaeā€™s levels are much higher in warmer waters, so as water temperatures rise, tropical species like Gambierdiscus are migrating northward into nonnative areas. The toxins produced by Gambierdiscus do not hurt fish, but are harmful to humans. Studies like this will allow scientists to monitor the numbers of these algae populations and the potential risks as ocean water temperatures rise in the coming years.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p21-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
26716
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The North Carolina Department of Natural Resources has recommended that the General Assembly pass a ban on the use of phosphate detergents. The Clean Detergent Act would help eliminate the largest contributing factor to algae blooms in the Chowan and Neuse Rivers.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 4, July/Aug 1984, p3-4, il
Record #:
28427
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Greenfield Lake in Wilmington, North Carolina has experienced recent problems with algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen levels, and fish kills. Many of these issues have likely been caused by high nutrient loading. This study examined lake sediment as a source and sink for phosphorus, the nutrient most often responsible for freshwater eutrophication.
Record #:
28384
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Fast Technology for Analysis of nucleic acids (FTA) cards are embedded with special chemicals that inhibit degradation of DNA. The FTA card system was tested on marine green and red algae collected in New Hanover County, North Carolina. Overall, the use of FTA cards to preserve marine algal DNA is promising.
Record #:
28559
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Research on the North Carolina coast reveals the toxic nature of marine snow as algal blooms die and sink to the seafloor. This study was the first to document how toxins are produced throughout marine snow formation and how long they persist in the environment.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p16, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
33490
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In March the Environmental Management Commission ruled that municipalities and industrial operations which discharge treated wastewater into Falls and Jordan Lakes must reduce phosphorus levels by 1990. Falls and Jordan Lakes were declared nutrient-sensitive in 1983, and stringent regulations were imposed to control the growth of algae in the lakes. A lower phosphorus standard will make it more feasible to employ biological, rather than chemical, methods to remove phosphorus.
Record #:
33496
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A report published by the Water Resources Research Institute concludes that nitrogen loading should be reduced by at least thirty-percent and that phosphorus loading should be reduced by at least fifty-percent to stem algal blooms and support a long-term management strategy for the lower Neuse River.
Record #:
33579
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Nuisance blooms of blue-green algae have caused water quality problems in the Chowan and Neuse Rivers, and the potential for similar algal problems is uncertain in new impoundments such as the Jordan and the Falls of the Neuse reservoirs. Dr. Val Smith in the Department of Biology at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill has developed models predicting algae biomass and applied the models to North Carolina reservoirs.
Record #:
34268
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The rivers and estuaries of coastal North Carolina have experienced unprecedented increases in nutrient loading over the last fifty years. This has resulted in a proliferation of water quality problems including algae blooms, anoxic water and fish kills. The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources Science Advisory Council recommends continuation of an intensive long-term monitoring and modeling program for the Neuse River Estuary.
Record #:
34325
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In the early 1970s, the Chowan River Estuary and other waterbodies in North Carolina experienced algae blooms that interfered with industrial water supply, fishing and recreational use. Extensive research led the North Carolina Division of Water Quality to develop standards for chlorophyll-a, which is an indicator of algal biomass and water quality. This article discusses how these water quality standards were developed.